WBUR

Mass. Business Confidence Index Sees Big Drop

A monthly measure of the confidence of Massachusetts businesses is showing its worst reading in nearly a year.

The Associated Industries of Massachusetts Business Confidence Index dropped 8.5 points in June.

The index now stands at 48.3; anything below 50 is considered negative territory. The index has not been below 50 since October.

“The 8.5-point monthly loss [in June] is the second-largest in the Index’s 21-year history,” according to a release from AIM.

The index’s fall, however, was not entirely surprising to AIM.

“A drop was hardly unexpected, especially in view of a spate of negative economic reports during the month,” said Raymond Torto, chair of AIM’s Board of Economic Advisors. “It remains to be seen how long this slump will last, and whether the size of the June decline may have been exaggerated by the timing of the responses.”

Torto cited concerns about Europe’s ongoing economic crisis and May’s disappointing national jobs report among reasons for the fall in reported business confidence.

The release adds: “The AIM Index is [now] off 1.7 points over one year and 5.4 over two years, but up 20.1 compared to June 2009.”

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  • http://twitter.com/constancek67 Constance Kilsurmart

    MAD DOG MILLIONAIRE AKA PUNYAMURTULA KISHORE MD2020 ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION SPECIALIST (PENIS/DICK DOCTOR)I was in a AA meeting once and the speaker mentioned Dr Kishore, and the entire room erupted into laughter. I saw him back in the late 90…s and he was a quack then. He was FAR from free. He had been fined years ago because when you sat in his waiting room (an hour was considered quick) he’d bill the insurance co’s for that time. Then once you saw him he’d tell you what a great guy he was for working with addicts. Ive been clean for over 10 years now and those professionals who really helped me were ones that didnt need to continiously pat themselves on the back. Addicts are a nightmare to work with, and I commend all those that put up with it all to help those in need. But theres no way you’re ever going to convince me Kishore was one of those people. This Fool Punyamurtula Kishore MD aka MAD DOG was never licensed by Mass. Dept of Public Health to practice Addiction Medicine. Punyamurtula Kishore MD aka MAD Dog Millionaire is a fraud , The American College of Addiction Medicine and the National Library of Addiction has never existed except on paper. Punyamurtula Kishore has been indicted by 3 Grand Juries for Medical Insurance Fraud , bribery and giving out and receiving kickbacks. He was involved in Corruption when he was the Medical Director at the Massachusetts Dept. of Correction , Martha Eliot Health Ctr , Roxbury Comprehensive Health Ctr. and his possess Medical Practice , Preventive Medicine Associates.formerly Addiction Medicine Associates. He used two entities he created on paper that never existed called the National library of Addictions and the American College of Addiction Medicine to advocate his emergence in the field of addiction medicine. This unscrupulous MD used and exploited his patients and employees for financial wealth. The only thing that MAD DOG MILLIONAIRE aka Punyamurtula Kishore cared about was making money at the expense of someone elses misery

  • Respond Justice

    When adults respond quickly and consistently to bullying behavior they send the message that it is not acceptable. Research shows this can stop bullying behavior over time. There are simple steps adults can take to stop bullying on the spot and keep kids safe.
    Do:
    Intervene immediately. It is ok to get another adult to help.Separate the kids involved.Make sure everyone is safe.Meet any immediate medical or mental health needs.Stay calm. Reassure the kids involved, including bystanders.Model respectful behavior when you intervene.
    Avoid these common mistakes:
    Don’t ignore it. Don’t think kids can work it out without adult help.Don’t immediately try to sort out the facts.Don’t force other kids to say publicly what they saw.Don’t question the children involved in front of other kids.Don’t talk to the kids involved together, only separately.Don’t make the kids involved apologize or patch up relations on the spot.
    Get police help or medical attention immediately if:
    A weapon is involved.There are threats of serious physical injury.There are threats of hate-motivated violence, such as racism or homophobia.There is serious bodily harm.There is sexual abuse.Anyone is accused of an illegal act, such as robbery or extortion—using force to get money, property, or services.
    Next Steps
    Support the kids involved

  • Anti Cyber Bully

    Support the Kids Involved All kids involved in bullying—whether they are bullied, bully others, or see bullying—can be affected. It is important to support all kids involved to make sure the bullying doesn’t continue and effects can be minimized.
    Support Kids Who are BulliedAddress Bullying BehaviorSupport Bystanders Who Witness Bullying
    Support Kids Who are Bullied
    Listen and focus on the child. Learn what’s been going on and show you want to help.
    Assure the child that bullying is not their fault.
    Know that kids who are bullied may struggle with talking about it. Consider referring them to a school counselor, psychologist, or other mental health service.
    Give advice about what to do. This may involve role-playing and thinking through how the child might react if the bullying occurs again.
    Work together to resolve the situation and protect the bullied child. The child, parents, and school or organization may all have valuable input. It may help to:
    Ask the child being bullied what can be done to make him or her feel safe. Remember that changes to routine should be minimized. He or she is not at fault and should not be singled out. For example, consider rearranging classroom or bus seating plans for everyone. If bigger moves are necessary, such as switching classrooms or bus routes, the child who is bullied should not be forced to change.Develop a game plan. Maintain open communication between schools, organizations, and parents. Discuss the steps that are taken and the limitations around what can be done based on policies and laws. Remember, the law does not allow school personnel to discuss discipline, consequences, or services given to other children.
    Be persistent. Bullying may not end overnight. Commit to making it stop and consistently support the bullied child.
    Avoid these mistakes:
    Never tell the child to ignore the bullying.Do not blame the child for being bullied. Even if he or she provoked the bullying, no one deserves to be bullied.Do not tell the child to physically fight back against the kid who is bullying. It could get the child hurt, suspended, or expelled.Parents should resist the urge to contact the other parents involved. It may make matters worse. School or other officials can act as mediators between parents.
    Follow-up. Show a commitment to making bullying stop. Because bullying is behavior that repeats or has the potential to be repeated, it takes consistent effort to ensure that it stops.
    Back to top

    Address Bullying Behavior
    Parents, school staff, and organizations all have a role to play.
    Make sure the child knows what the problem behavior is. Young people who bully must learn their behavior is wrong and harms others.
    Show kids that bullying is taken seriously. Calmly tell the child that bullying will not be tolerated. Model respectful behavior when addressing the problem.
    Work with the child to understand some of the reasons he or she bullied. For example:
    Sometimes children bully to fit in. These kids can benefit from participating in positive activities. Involvement in sports and clubs can enable them to take leadership roles and make friends without feeling the need to bully.Other times kids act out because something else—issues at home, abuse, stress—is going on in their lives. They also may have been bullied. These kids may be in need of additional support, such as mental health services.
    Use consequences to teach. Consequences that involve learning or building empathy can help prevent future bullying. School staff should remember to follow the guidelines in their student code of conduct and other policies in developing consequences and assigning discipline. For example, the child who bullied can:
    Lead a class discussion about how to be a good friend.Write a story about the effects of bullying or benefits of teamwork.Role-play a scenario or make a presentation about the importance of respecting others, the negative effects of gossip, or how to cooperate.Do a project about civil rights and bullying.Read a book about bullying.Make posters for the school about cyberbullying and being smart online.
    Involve the kid who bullied in making amends or repairing the situation. The goal is to help them see how their actions affect others. For example, the child can:
    Write a letter apologizing to the student who was bullied.Do a good deed for the person who was bullied or for others in your community.Clean up, repair, or pay for any property they damaged.
    Avoid strategies that don’t work or have negative consequences.
    Zero tolerance or “three strikes, you’re out” strategies don’t work. Suspending or expelling students who bully does not reduce bullying behavior. Students and teachers may be less likely to report and address bullying if suspension or expulsion is the consequence.Conflict resolution and peer mediation don’t work for bullying. Bullying is not a conflict between people of equal power who share equal blame. Facing those who have bullied may further upset kids who have been bullied.Group treatment for students who bully doesn’t work. Group members tend to reinforce bullying behavior in each other.
    Follow-up. After the bullying issue is resolved, continue finding ways to help the child who bullied to understand how what they do affects other people. For example, praise acts of kindness or talk about what it means to be a good friend.
    Back to top

    Support Bystanders Who Witness Bullying
    Even if kids are not bullied or bullying others they can be affected by bullying. Many times, when they see bullying, they may not know what to do to stop it. They may not feel safe stepping in in the moment, but there are many other steps they can take:
    Spend time with the person being bullied at school. Talk with them, sit with them at lunch, or play with them at recess.Listen to them.Call the person being bullied at home to encourage them and give advice.Tell an adult who you trust, like your teacher or coach. You can tell them in person or leave them a note.Set a good example. Do not bully others.Send a text message or go up to the person who was bullied later and say that wasn’t cool and I’m here for you.Help the person being bullied get away from the situation.Help the person being bullied tell an adult.Take away the audience by choosing not to watch and walk away.Be kind to the person being bullied at another time.Tell the person being bullied that you don’t like the bullying and ask them if you can do anything to help.Tell the child doing the bullying that you don’t like it and to stop doing it (but only if it feels safe to do so).Distract the bully or offer an escape for the target by saying something like, “Mr. Smith needs to see you right now” or “Come on, we need you for our game” (but only if it feels safe to do so).Don’t combat violence with violence. It takes a lot of courage for someone to step up on behalf of a bullied person. However, don’t use insults or physical violence to defend the victim. Now is not the time to show off. You will most likely only make it harder for the victim.Do not get discouraged if you have already talked to the teachers and nothing happened. Keep trying. Teachers and other school authorities will respond if they find out that the bullying is becoming a recurrent problem. Try talking to other teachers and counselors so that you can get more people involved in trying to stop the situation.If you feel that this is none of your business, put yourself in the victim’s shoes. Bullying can cause severe anxiety, depression, anger, and frustration in a person, and can turn their life into a nightmare. You wouldn’t want to feel that way.Look for opportunities to contribute to the anti-bullying culture of your

  • Internet Vigilance

    Massachusetts Anti-Bullying Laws & Policies What term is used in the Massachusetts anti-bullying laws?
    Bullying.
    Do these laws cover cyberbullying?
    Yes.
    What groups are listed under Massachusetts state law?
    There are no specific groups listed in Massachusetts anti-bullying laws.
    Schools that receive federal funding are required by federal law to address discrimination on a number of different personal characteristics. Find out when bullying may be a civil rights violation.
    Is there a state model policy I can use to create anti-bullying policies at my school or district?
    A state model policy is available at the Massachusetts Department of Education .
    Which of the key components can be found in Massachusetts anti-bullying laws and policies?
    Key ComponentsPresent in Massachusetts State LawsPresent in Massachusetts Model PolicyDEFINITIONSPurposeYESYESScopeYESYESProhibited BehaviorYESYESEnumerated GroupsNOYESDISTRICT POLICY REVIEW & DEVELOPMENTDistrict PolicyYESN/ADistrict Policy ReviewYESN/ADISTRICT POLICY COMPONENTSDefinitionsYESN/AReportingYESYESInvestigationsYESYESWritten RecordsNOYESConsequencesYESYESMental HealthYESYESADDITIONAL COMPONENTSCommunicationsYESYESTraining/PreventionYESYESTransparency/MonitoringNOYESLegal RemediesYESYESNOTE: Click on the Key Components links to get more information about that component.
    What are the Massachusetts state laws that cover bullying?
    Massachusetts General Laws Chapter §69 Section 1D – The board shall establish a set of statewide educational goals for all public elementary and secondary schools in the commonwealthMassachusetts General Laws Chapter §71, Section 37H – Policies relative to conduct of teachers or students; student handbooksMassachusetts General Laws Chapter §71, Section 37O – School bullying prohibited; bullying prevention plansMassachusetts General Laws Chapter §71 Section 93 – Policy regarding internet safety measures for schools providing computer access to studentsMassachusetts General Laws Chapter 265 Section 43 – Stalking; punishmentMassachusetts General Laws Chapter §265 Section 43A – Criminal harassment; punishmentMassachusetts General Laws Chapter §269 Section 14A – Annoying telephone calls
    For More Information
    See “Bullying Prevention and Intervention Resources ” from the Massachusetts Department of Education.
    Information for this page was developed from “Analysis of State Bullying Laws and Policies – December 2011” (U.S. Department of Education).

  • Offering Hope

    Federal Laws Although no federal law directly addresses bullying, in some cases, bullying overlaps with discriminatory harassment when it is based on race, national origin, color, sex, age, disability, or religion. When bullying and harassment overlap, federally-funded schools (including colleges and universities) have an obligation to resolve the harassment. When the situation is not adequately resolved, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights and the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division may be able to help.
    Are there federal laws that apply to bullying?
    At present, no federal law directly addresses bullying. In some cases, bullying overlaps with discriminatory harassment which is covered under federal civil rights laws enforced by the U.S. Department of Education (ED) and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). No matter what label is used (e.g., bullying, hazing, teasing), schools are obligated by these laws to address conduct that is:
    Severe, pervasive or persistentCreates a hostile environment at school. That is, it is sufficiently serious that it interferes with or limits a student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, or opportunities offered by a schoolBased on a student’s race, color, national origin, sex, disability, or religion* Although the US Department of Education, under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 does not directly cover religion, often religious based harassment is based on shared ancestry of ethnic characteristics which is covered. The US Department of Justice has jurisdiction over religion under Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
    What are the federal civil rights laws ED and DOJ enforce?
    A school that fails to respond appropriately to harassment of students based on a protected class may be violating one or more civil rights laws enforced by the Department of Education and the Department of Justice, including: Title IV and Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973Titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities ActIndividuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

  • Addiction

    Why is cyberbullying not allowed on WikiAnswers?
    In:Catch-All QuestionsWant to Be a Disney Star?ExploreTalent.com/TeensAuditions & Open Calls Now Open, You Might be the Next Star, Act NowFalse Claims Act Qui Tamwww.AshcraftAndGerel.com/FalseClaimThinking of Blowing the Whistle? It’s Up To You – Qui Tam Law Firm
    Ads
    Answer:If you believe the question you asked is appropriate please e-mail GoodQuestion @ WikiAnswers.com (no spaces) with the exact question you asked and why you believe it is acceptable.Cyberbullying Cyberbullying is not tolerated on WikiAnswers. If you cyberbully through WikiAnswers your account can be blocked and your IP address logged for investigation. All users and IP addresses found to have engaged in cyberbullying may be reported to law enforcement. Cyberbullying is using any electronic device or website to harm someone else. This includes insulting, revealing personal information, and harassing them. WikiAnswers understands that bullying is not mature or appropriate behavior, and will not support any sort of bullying. Please review the Cyberbullying Policy on WikiAnswers: http://wiki.answers.com/help/cyberbullying Why do people insult other people? Most people who insult other people are insecure. They think that it will make them feel better if they put someone else down, or they insult the other person to take attention off of themselves. Sometimes people who are angry insult other people because they are not mature enough to think of a different way to handle their anger except to try to start a fight or to try to make the other person feel bad. Mature people can communicate with others without insulting them. Any ideas can be discussed between mature adults without fighting or insulting each other. Mature people can “agree to disagree” and give each other the right to have different opinions. The best way to handle an insult is to ignore it, because what the immature person wants is to make you upset. If you cannot ignore the insult, you can say something like, “Mature people don’t have to insult each other to communicate,” and walk away. Walking away is always best because the immature person is not going to change and suddenly stop acting immature. If the person insulting you is someone you want to keep as a friend, you should say something like, “That really hurts my feelings when you say something like that. Can we talk without insults?” – this lets the person know that they need to change their behavior, and if they are friends, they will want to change and mature.
    It’s a personal matter… Since many bullying questions involve someone’s sexual preferences, WikiAnswers cannot provide answers for these questions. However, if you are genuinely curious of someone’s sexual preference, why not just ask them? We here at WikiAnswers do not know your friends anyway, so we would not have an answer. Not only that, but a person’s sexual preference is often a very personal matter for them, and they probably would not like that information to be broadcast here. Other responses from our contributors:We believe that people should be treated with dignity and respect. Cyberbullying is neither dignified, nor respectful of other people. When you visit our site, we want you to have fun and to get the answers you need. We don’t think that being cyberbullied is a fun way to spend your time here.

    Read more: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Why_is_cyberbullying_not_allowed_on_WikiAnswers#ixzz20MbovID4

  • http://twitter.com/constancek67 Constance Kilsurmart

    Punyamurtula Kishore Md aka Mad Dog Millionaire has been suspended fromseveral Boston and greater Boston Hospitals for sexual misconduct withmale patients Check Ma Medical reg. for order Punyamurtula Kishoreaka Mad Dog Millionaire has admitted himself to Mcleans hospital inBelmont Massachusetts for sex addiction and erectile dysfunction punyamurtula Kishore Md’s license applicationn to practice and intern as a Gynaecologist rejected?
    Punyamurtula Kishore Md s license applicatoin to practice and intern as a Gynaecologist has been rejected by the Ma Board Registry of Medicine

  • http://twitter.com/constancek67 Constance Kilsurmart

    Punyamurtula Kishore Md aka Mad Dog Millionaire has been suspended fromseveral Boston and greater Boston Hospitals for sexual misconduct withmale patients Check Ma Medical reg. for order Punyamurtula Kishoreaka Mad Dog Millionaire has admitted himself to Mcleans hospital inBelmont Massachusetts for sex addiction and erectile dysfunction punyamurtula Kishore Md’s license applicationn to practice and intern as a Gynaecologist rejected?
    Punyamurtula Kishore Md s license applicatoin to practice and intern as a Gynaecologist has been rejected by the Ma Board Registry

  • http://twitter.com/constancek67 Constance Kilsurmart

    Punyamurtula Kishore Md aka Mad Dog Millionaire has been suspended fromseveral Boston and greater Boston Hospitals for sexual misconduct withmale patients Check Ma Medical reg. for order Punyamurtula Kishoreaka Mad Dog Millionaire has admitted himself to Mcleans hospital inBelmont Massachusetts for sex addiction and erectile dysfunction punyamurtula Kishore Md’s license applicationn to practice and intern as a Gynaecologist rejected?
    Punyamurtula Kishore Md s license applicatoin to practice and intern as a Gynaecologist has been rejected by the Ma Board Registry of Medicine

  • Civil Society

    Growing awarenessThe term “cyberbullying” was first coined and defined by Canadian educator and anti-bullying activist Bill Belsey, as “the use of information and communication technologies to support deliberate, repeated, and hostile behavior by an individual or group, that is intended to harm others.”[1]
    Cyberbullying has subsequently been defined as “when the Internet, cell phones or other devices are used to send or post text or images intended to hurt or embarrass another person”.[8] Other researchers use similar language to describe the phenomenon.[9][10]

    Law enforcement: cyberbullying, cyberstalking and electronic harassment
    A majority of states have laws that explicitly include electronic forms of communication within stalking or harassment laws.[11][12]
    Most law enforcement agencies have cyber-crime units and often Internet stalking is treated with more seriousness than reports of physical stalking.[13] Help and resources can be searched by State or area.
    Schools
    The safety of schools is increasingly becoming a focus of state legislative action. There was an increase in cyberbullying enacted legislation between 2006-2010.[14]
    In 2012, a group of teens in New Haven, Connecticut developed an app to help fight bullying. Called “Back Off Bully” (BOB), the web app is an anonymous resource for computer, smart phone or iPad. When someone witnesses or is the victim of bullying, they can immediately report the incident. The app asks questions about time, location and how the bullying is happening. As well as providing positive action and empowerment over an incident, the reported information helps by going to a data base where administrators study it. Common threads are spotted so others can intervene and break the bully’s pattern.[15] BOB, the brainchild of fourteen teens in a design class, is being considered as standard operating procedure at schools across the state.
    Protection for victims of any age
    There are laws that only address online harassment of children or focus on child predators as well as laws that protect adult cyberstalking victims, or victims of any age. Currently, there are 45 cyberstalking (and related) laws on the books.
    While some sites specialize in laws that protect victims age 18 and under, Working to Halt Online Abuse is a help resource containing a list of current and pending cyberstalking-related United States federal and state laws.[16] It also lists those states that do not have laws yet and related laws from other countries. The Global Cyber Law Database (GCLD) aims to become the most comprehensive and authoritative source of cyber laws for all countries.[17]
    Behavior
    Children and adolescents
    Kids report being mean to each other online beginning as young as 2nd grade. According to research, boys initiate mean online activity earlier than girls do. However, by middle school, girls are more likely to engage in cyberbullying than boys do.[18] Whether the bully is male or female, his or her purpose is to intentionally embarrass others, harass, intimidate, or make threats online to one another. This bullying occurs via email, text messaging, posts to blogs, and web sites.
    The National Crime Prevention Association lists tactics often used by teen cyberbullies.[19]
    Pretend they are other people online to trick othersSpread lies and rumors about victimsTrick people into revealing personal informationSend or forward mean text messagesPost pictures of victims without their consent
    Studies in the psychosocial effects of cyberspace have begun to monitor the impacts cyberbullying may have on the victims, and the consequences it may lead to. Consequences of cyberbullying are multi-faceted, and affect online and offline behavior. Research on adolescents reported that changes in the victims’ behavior as a result of cyberbullying could be positive. Victims “created a cognitive pattern of bullies, which consequently helped them to recognize aggressive people.”[20] However, the Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace abstract reports critical impacts in almost all of the respondents’, taking the form of lower self-esteem, loneliness, disillusionment, and distrust of people. The more extreme impacts were self-harm. Children have killed each other and committed suicide after having been involved in a cyberbullying incident.[21]
    The most current research in the field defines cyberbullying as “an aggressive, intentional act or behaviour that is carried out by a group or an individual repeatedly and over time against a victim who cannot easily defend him or herself” (Smith & Slonje, 2007, p. 249). [22] Though the use of sexual remarks and threats are sometimes present in cyberbullying, it is not the same as sexual harassment, typically occurs among peers, and does not necessarily involve sexual predators.
    Adults
    Stalking online has criminal consequences just as physical stalking. A target’s understanding of why cyberstalking is happening is helpful to remedy and take protective action to restore remedy. Cyberstalking is an extension of physical stalking.[23] Among factors that motivate stalkers are: envy, pathological obsession (professional or sexual), unemployment or failure with own job or life; intention to intimidate and cause others to feel inferior; the stalker is delusional and believes he/she “knows” the target; the stalker wants to instill fear in a person to justify his/her status; belief they can get away with it (anonymity).[24][25] UK National Workplace Bullying Advice Line theorizes that bullies harass victims in order to make up for inadequacies in their own lives.[26]
    The US federal cyberstalking law is designed to prosecute people for using electronic means to repeatedly harass or threaten someone online. There are resources dedicated to assisting adult victims deal with cyberbullies legally and effectively. One of the steps recommended is to record everything and contact police.[27] [28]
    Research
    In the summer of 2008, researchers Sameer Hinduja (Florida Atlantic University) and Justin Patchin (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire) published a book on cyber-bullying that summarized the current state of cyber-bullying research. (Bullying Beyond the Schoolyard: Preventing and Responding to Cyberbullying).[29] Their research documents that cyber-bullying instances have been increasing over the last several years. They also report findings from the most recent study of cyber-bullying among middle-school students. Using a random sample of approximately 2000 middle-school students from a large school district in the southern United States, about 10% of respondents had been cyber-bullied in the previous 30 days while over 17% reported being cyber-bullied at least once in their lifetime.[29] While these rates are slightly lower than some of the findings from their previous research, Hinduja and Patchin point out that the earlier studies were predominantly conducted among older adolescents and Internet samples. That is, older youth use the Internet more frequently and are more likely to experience cyber-bullying than younger children.[10][30][31]In addition to the current research, Sourander et al. (2010) conducted a population-based cross-sectional study that took place in Finland. The authors of this study took the self-reports of 2215 Finish adolescents between the ages of 13 to 16 years old about cyberbullying and cybervictimization during the past 6 months. It was found that, amongst the total sample, 4.8% were cybervictims only, 7.4% were cyberbullies only, and 5.4% were cyberbully-victims. Cybervictim-only status was associated with a variety of factors, including emotional and peer problems, sleeping difficulties, and feeling unsafe in school. Cyberbully-only status was associated with factors such as hyperactivity and low prosocial behavior, as well as conduct problems. Cyberbully-victim status was associated with all of the risk factors that were associated with both cybervictim-only status and cyberbully-only status. The authors of this study were able to conclude that cyberbullying as well as cybervictimization is associated not only with psychiatric issues, but psychosomatic issues. Many adolescents in the study reported headaches or difficulty sleeping. The authors believe that their results indicate a greater need for new ideas on how to prevent cyberbullying and what to do when it occurs. It is clearly a world-wide problem that needs to be taken seriously.[32]
    Surveys and statistics

  • Articles Boston

    Legislation against cyberbullyingMain article: Cyberstalking legislation
    United States
    Legislation geared at penalizing cyberbullying has been introduced in a number of U.S. states including New York, Missouri, Rhode Island and Maryland. At least seven states passed laws against digital harassment in 2007. Dardenne Prairie of Springfield, Missouri, passed a city ordinance making online harassment a misdemeanor. The city of St. Charles, Missouri has passed a similar ordinance. Missouri is among other states where lawmakers are pursuing state legislation, with a task forces expected to have “cyberbullying” laws drafted and implemented.[46] In June, 2008, Rep. Linda Sanchez (D-Calif.) and Rep. Kenny Hulshof (R-Mo.) proposed a federal law that would criminalize acts of cyberbullying.[47]
    Lawmakers are seeking to address cyberbullying with new legislation because there’s currently no specific law on the books that deals with it. A fairly new federal cyberstalking law might address such acts, according to Parry Aftab, but no one has been prosecuted under it yet. The proposed federal law would make it illegal to use electronic means to “coerce, intimidate, harass or cause other substantial emotional distress.”
    In August 2008, the California state legislature passed one of the first laws in the country to deal directly with cyberbullying. The legislation, Assembly Bill 86 2008, gives school administrators the authority to discipline students for bullying others offline or online.[48] This law took effect, January 1, 2009.[49]
    A recent ruling first seen in the UK determined that it is possible for an Internet Service Provider (ISP) to be liable for the content of sites which it hosts, setting a precedent that any ISP should treat a notice of complaint seriously and investigate it immediately.[50]
    18 U.S.C. § 875(c) criminalizes the making of threats via Internet.
    Harmful effects
    Research had demonstrated a number of serious consequences of cyberbullying victimization.[10][29][30][31] For example, victims have lower self-esteem, increased suicidal ideation, and a variety of emotional responses, retaliating, being scared, frustrated, angry, and depressed.[29]
    One of the most damaging effects is that a victim begins to avoid friends and activities, often the very intention of the cyber-bully.
    Cyberbullying campaigns are sometimes so damaging that victims have committed suicide. There are at least four examples in the United States where cyber-bullying has been linked to the suicide of a teenager.[29] The suicide of Megan Meier is a recent example that led to the conviction of the adult perpetrator of the attacks.
    Intimidation, emotional damage, suicide
    According to the Cyberbullying Research Center, “there have been several high‐profile cases involving teenagers taking their own lives in part because of being harassed and mistreated over the Internet, a phenomenon we have termed cyberbullicide – suicide indirectly or directly influenced by experiences with online aggression.”[51]
    The reluctance youth have in telling an authority figure about instances of cyberbullying has led to fatal outcomes. At least three children between the ages of 12 and 13 have committed suicide due to depression brought on by cyberbullying, according to reports by USA Today and the Baltimore Examiner. These would include the suicide of Ryan Halligan and the suicide of Megan Meier, the latter of which resulted in United States v. Lori Drew.
    Lost revenue, threatened earnings, defamation
    Studies are being conducted by large companies to gauge loss of revenue through malicious false postings. Cyberstalkers seek to damage their victim’s earnings, employment, reputation, or safety. A 2008 High Court ruling determined that, generally speaking, slander is when a defamatory statement has been made orally without justification. Libelous statements are those that are recorded with some degree of permanence. This would include statements made by email or on online bulletin boards.[52]
    Adults and the workplace
    Cyberbullying is not limited to personal attacks or children. Cyberharassment, referred to as cyberstalking when involving adults, takes place in the workplace or on company web sites, blogs or product reviews.
    A survey of 1,072 workers by the Dignity and Work Partnership found that one in five had been bullied at work by e-mail and research has revealed 1 in 10 UK employees believes cyberbullying is a problem in their workplace.[53]
    Cyberbullying can occur in product reviews along with other consumer-generated data are being more closely monitored and flagged for content that is deemed malicious and biased as these sites have become tools to cyberbully by way of malicious requests for deletion of articles, vandalism, abuse of administrative positions, and ganging up on products to post “false” reviews and vote products down.
    Cyberstalkers use posts, forums, journals and other online means to present a victim in a false and unflattering light. The question of liability for harassment and character assassination is particularly salient to legislative protection since the original authors of the offending material are, more often than not, not only anonymous, but untraceable. Nevertheless, abuse should be consistently brought to company staffers’ attention.
    Recognition of adult and workplace cyberbullying tactics
    Common tactics used by cyberstalkers is to vandalize a search engine or encyclopedia, to threaten a victim’s earnings, employment, reputation, or safety. Various companies provide cases of cyber-stalking (involving adults) follow the pattern of repeated actions against a target. While motives vary, whether romantic, a business conflict of interest, or personal dislike, the target is commonly someone whose life the stalker sees or senses elements lacking in his or her own life. Web-based products or services leveraged against cyberstalkers in the harassment or defamation of their victims.
    The source of the defamation seems to come from four types of online information purveyors: Weblogs, industry forums or boards, and commercial Web sites. Studies reveal that while some motives are personal dislike, there is often direct economic motivation by the cyberstalker, including conflict of interest, and investigations reveal the responsible party is an affiliate or supplier of a competitor, or the competitor itself.
    Awareness campaigns
    Spain
    There are multiple non-profit organizations that fight cyberbullying and cyberstalking. They advise victims, provide awareness campaigns, and report offenses to the police. These NGOs include the Protégeles, PantallasAmigas, Foundation Alia2, the non-profit initiative Actúa Contra el Ciberacoso, the National Communications Technology Institute (INTECO), the Agency of Internet quality, the Agencia Española de Protección de Datos, the Oficina de Seguridad del Internauta, the Spanish Internet users’ Association, the Internauts’ Association, and the Spanish Association of Mothers and Parents Internauts. The Government of Castile and León has also created a Plan de Prevención del Ciberacoso y Promoción de la Navegación Segura en Centro Escolares, and the Government of the Canary Islands has created a portal on the phenomenon called Viveinternet.
    United Kingdom
    Cyberbullying was the subject of a forum at the British House of Commons chaired by Tim Loughton and Louise Burfitt-Dons of Act Against Bullying.[54]
    United States
    In March 2007, the Advertising Council in the United States, in partnership with the National Crime Prevention Council, U.S. Department of Justice, and Crime Prevention Coalition of America, joined to announce the launch of a new public service advertising campaign designed to educate preteens and teens about how they can play a role in ending cyber-bullying.
    A Pew Internet and American Life survey found that 33% of teens were subject to some sort of cyber-bullying.[55]
    January 20, 2008 – the Boy Scouts of America’s 2008 edition of The Boy Scout Handbook addresses how to deal with online bullying. A new First Class rank requirements adds: “Describe the three things you should avoid doing related to use of the Internet. Describe a cyberbully and how you should respond to one.” [56] [57]
    January 31, 2008 – KTTV Fox 11 News based in Los Angeles put out a report about organized cyber-bullying on sites like Stickam by people who call themselves “/b/rothas”.[58] The site had put out report on July 26, 2007, about a subject that partly featured cyberbullying titled “hackers on steroids”.[59]
    June 2, 2008 – Parents, teens, teachers, and Internet executives came together at Wired Safety’s International Stop Cyberbullying Conference, a two-day gathering in White Plains, New York and New York City. Executives from Facebook, Verizon, MySpace, Microsoft, and many others talked with hundreds about how to better protect themselves, personal reputations, kids and businesses online from harassment. Sponsors of the conference included McAfee, AOL, Disney, Procter & Gamble, Girl Scouts of the USA, WiredTrust, Children’s Safety Research and Innovation Centre, KidZui.com and others. This conference was being delivered in conjunction and with the support of Pace University. Topics addressed included cyberbullying and the law, with discussions about laws governing cyberbullying and how to distinguish between rudeness and criminal harassment. Additional forums addressed parents’ legal responsibilities, the need for more laws, how to handle violent postings of videos be handled, as well as the differentiation between free speech and hate speech. Cyberharassment vs. cyberbullying was a forefront topic, where age makes a difference and abusive internet behavior by adults with repeated clear intent to harm, ridicule or damage a person or business was classified as stalking harassment vs. bullying by teens and young adults.[60]
    Community support
    A number of businesses and organizations are in coalition to provide awareness, protection and recourse for the escalating problem. Some aim to inform and provide measures to avoid as well as effectively terminate cyber-bullying and cyber-harassment. Anti-bullying charity Act Against Bullying launched the CyberKind campaign in August 2009 to promote positive internet usage.

  • Respond Justice

    Massachusetts Anti-Bullying Laws & Policies What term is used in the Massachusetts anti-bullying laws?
    Bullying.
    Do these laws cover cyberbullying?
    Yes.
    What groups are listed under Massachusetts state law?
    There are no specific groups listed in Massachusetts anti-bullying laws.
    Schools that receive federal funding are required by federal law to address discrimination on a number of different personal characteristics. Find out when bullying may be a civil rights violation.
    Is there a state model policy I can use to create anti-bullying policies at my school or district?
    A state model policy is available at the Massachusetts Department of Education .
    Which of the key components can be found in Massachusetts anti-bullying laws and policies?
    Key ComponentsPresent in Massachusetts State LawsPresent in Massachusetts Model PolicyDEFINITIONSPurposeYESYESScopeYESYESProhibited BehaviorYESYESEnumerated GroupsNOYESDISTRICT POLICY REVIEW & DEVELOPMENTDistrict PolicyYESN/ADistrict Policy ReviewYESN/ADISTRICT POLICY COMPONENTSDefinitionsYESN/AReportingYESYESInvestigationsYESYESWritten RecordsNOYESConsequencesYESYESMental HealthYESYESADDITIONAL COMPONENTSCommunicationsYESYESTraining/PreventionYESYESTransparency/MonitoringNOYESLegal RemediesYESYESNOTE: Click on the Key Components links to get more information about that component.
    What are the Massachusetts state laws that cover bullying?
    Massachusetts General Laws Chapter §69 Section 1D – The board shall establish a set of statewide educational goals for all public elementary and secondary schools in the commonwealthMassachusetts General Laws Chapter §71, Section 37H – Policies relative to conduct of teachers or students; student handbooksMassachusetts General Laws Chapter §71, Section 37O – School bullying prohibited; bullying prevention plansMassachusetts General Laws Chapter §71 Section 93 – Policy regarding internet safety measures for schools providing computer access to studentsMassachusetts General Laws Chapter 265 Section 43 – Stalking; punishmentMassachusetts General Laws Chapter §265 Section 43A – Criminal harassment; punishmentMassachusetts General Laws Chapter §269 Section 14A – Annoying telephone calls
    For More Information
    See “Bullying Prevention and Intervention Resources ” from the Massachusetts Department of Education.
    Information for this page was developed from “Analysis of State Bullying Laws and Policies – December 2011” (U.S. Department of Education).

  • Addiction

    Community Discussion Rules
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  • ANTI CYBER BULLY

    Federal Laws

    Although no federal law directly addresses bullying, in some cases, bullying overlaps with discriminatory harassment when it is based on race, national origin, color, sex, age, disability, or religion. When bullying and harassment overlap, federally-funded schools (including colleges and universities) have an obligation to resolve the harassment. When the situation is not adequately resolved, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights and the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division may be able to help.

    Are there federal laws that apply to bullying?

    At present, no federal law directly addresses bullying. In some cases, bullying overlaps with discriminatory harassment which is covered under federal civil rights laws enforced by the U.S. Department of Education (ED) and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). No matter what label is used (e.g., bullying, hazing, teasing), schools are obligated by these laws to address conduct that is:

    Severe, pervasive or persistent
    Creates a hostile environment at school. That is, it is sufficiently serious that it interferes with or limits a student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, or opportunities offered by a school
    Based on a student’s race, color, national origin, sex, disability, or religion*
    Although the US Department of Education, under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 does not directly cover religion, often religious based harassment is based on shared ancestry of ethnic characteristics which is covered. The US Department of Justice has jurisdiction over religion under Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
    What are the federal civil rights laws ED and DOJ enforce?

    A school that fails to respond appropriately to harassment of students based on a protected class may be violating one or more civil rights laws enforced by the Department of Education and the Department of Justice, including:
    Title IV and Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972
    Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
    Titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act
    Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)
    Do federal civil rights laws cover harassment of LGBT youth?

    Title IX and Title IV do not prohibit discrimination based solely on sexual orientation, but they protect all students, including students who are LGBT or perceived to be LGBT, from sex-based harassment.
    Harassment based on sex and sexual orientation are not mutually exclusive. When students are harassed based on their actual or perceived sexual orientation, they may also be subjected to forms of sex discrimination recognized under Title IX.
    What is an example of a case were harassment based on sex and sexual orientation overlap?

    A female high school student was spit on, slammed into lockers, mocked, and routinely called names because she did not conform to feminine stereotypes and because of her sexual orientation. The student had short hair, a deep voice, and wore male clothing. After the harassment started, she told some classmates she was a lesbian, and the harassment worsened. The school described the harassment as “sexual orientation harassment” in its incident reports and did not take any action.
    In this case, the student was harassed based on her non-conformity to gender stereotypes. In this case, then, although the school labeled the incident as “sexual orientation harassment,” the harassment was also based on sex and covered under Title IX.
    What are a school’s obligations regarding harassment based on protected classes?

    Anyone can report harassing conduct to a school. When a school receives a complaint they must take certain steps to investigate and resolve the situation.

    Immediate and appropriate action to investigate or otherwise determine what happened.
    Inquiry must be prompt, thorough, and impartial.
    Interview targeted students, offending students, and witnesses, and maintain written documentation of investigation
    Communicate with targeted students regarding steps taken to end harassment
    Check in with targeted students to ensure that harassment has ceased
    When an investigation reveals that harassment has occurred, a school should take steps reasonably calculated to:
    End the harassment,
    Eliminate any hostile environment,
    Prevent harassment from recurring, and
    Prevent retaliation against the targeted student(s) or complainant(s).
    What should a school do to resolve a harassment complaint?

    Appropriate responses will depend on the facts of each case.
    School must be an active participant in responding to harassment and should take reasonable steps when crafting remedies to minimize burdens on the targeted students.
    Possible responses include:
    Develop, revise, and publicize:
    Policy prohibiting harassment and discrimination
    Grievance procedures for students to file harassment complaints
    contact information for Title IX/Section 504/Title VI coordinators
    Implement training for staff and administration on identifying and addressing harassment
    Provide monitors or additional adult supervision in areas where harassment occurs
    Determine consequences and services for harassers, including whether discipline is appropriate
    Limit interactions between harassers and targets
    Provide harassed student an additional opportunity to obtain a benefit that was denied (e.g., retaking a test/class).
    Provide services to a student who was denied a benefit (e.g., academic support services).
    Are there resources for schools to assist with resolving harassment complaints?

    The Department of Justice’s Community Relations Service is the Department’s “peacemaker” for community conflicts and tensions arising from differences of race, color and national origin and to prevent and respond to violent hate crimes committed on the basis of: gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, disability, race, color, and national origin. It is a free, impartial, confidential and voluntary Federal Agency that offers mediation, conciliation, technical assistance, and training.

    What if the harassment continues?

    If harassment persists, consider filing a formal grievance with the district and contacting the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights and from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division.

  • Anti Cyber Bully

    A woman who was subjected to “vicious and depraved” abuse on Facebook has won a High Court legal battle to have her tormentors exposed, in a case believed to be among the first in Britain.

    Nicola Brookes, 45, was targeted on the social networking website after she posted a comment supporting the former X Factor contestant Frankie Cocozza when he was voted off the show last year. Her anonymous attackers set up a fake Facebook profile in her name, using her picture to post explicit comments, her solicitor explained. Frustrated at what she considered a lack of action by Sussex Police to help track the perpetrators, Ms Brookes, from Brighton, decided to take legal action. Her case went to the High Court in London, where an order was granted last week compelling Facebook to reveal the IP addresses and other information of those responsible.

    It is believed to be one of the first cases where an individual has successfully taken legal action against Facebook to reveal the identities of cyberbullies. Ms Brookes, a single mother who suffers from Crohn’s disease, now intends to bring private prosecutions against her abusers. “I’m going for the strongest possible prosecution against these people,” she said yesterday. “I want them exposed. They exposed me and they invaded my life. I didn’t ask for it. They wanted a reaction from me and now they have got it.”

    She added that it was the “speed and viciousness” of the postings that alarmed her, adding: “After posting the comment about Frankie Cocozza, I went back to Facebook about an hour later and there was loads of abuse. At the time, I thought of it as banter.

    “But after a few days people starting saying to me ‘You’re popping up all over the internet’. People were inciting hatred against me. They weren’t just targeting me, they were also dragging young girls into it as well. They weren’t playing.”

    It will not be the first time that police have successfully brought so-called “internet trolls” in front of the courts. In March, Liam Stacey, 21, from Pontypridd in south Wales, was jailed for 56 days for mocking the Bolton footballer Fabrice Muamba on Twitter after he collapsed with a heart attack on the pitch.

    Ms Brookes’ solicitor, Rupinder Bains, explained that the order granted by the High Court was called a Norwich Pharmacal – a type of disclosure order which effectively compelled Facebook to hand over information.

    “We don’t know how useful that information is going to be until we have it,” she said. “It may turn out to be fake. If that’s the case, it will be the internet service providers who will be most useful to us because they will hold the bill-payers’ addresses and we will have to get a further order.”

    Facebook shares information such as IP addresses and basic subscriber information, including names, email addresses and registration dates, when there is a legal justification and obligation, backed up by a court order. Yesterday a spokesman said: “There is no place for harassment on Facebook, but unfortunately a small minority of malicious individuals exist online, just as they do offline.”

    Sussex Police said they had asked Facebook to remove any abusive posts about Ms Brookes and that an investigation was still continuing.

    Cotton hits back at online tormentors

    Fearne Cotton has accused those who criticised her part in the BBC’s coverage of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee of being bullies. “People who sit lazily and judge others will never grow,” she wrote on Twitter. In a later tweet she added: “Grown men who slag me off in articles/online are huge bullies. I love my job and wouldn’t be doing it if I wasnt any good at it.”

     ”We don’t know how useful that information is going to be until we have it,” she said. “It may turn out to be fake. If that’s the case, it will be the internet service providers who will be most useful to us because they will hold the bill-payers’ addresses and we will have to get a further order.”

    Facebook shares information such as IP addresses and basic subscriber information, including names, email addresses and registration dates, when there is a legal justification and obligation, backed up by a court order. Yesterday a spokesman said: “There is no place for harassment on Facebook, but unfortunately a small minority of malicious individuals exist online, just as they do offline.”

    Sussex Police said they had asked Facebook to remove any abusive posts about Ms Brookes and that an investigation was still continuing.

    Cotton hits back at online tormentors

    Fearne Cotton has accused those who criticised her part in the BBC’s coverage of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee of being bullies. “People who sit lazily and judge others will never grow,” she wrote on Twitter. In a later tweet she added: “Grown men who slag me off in articles/online are huge bullies. I love my job and wouldn’t be doing it if I wasnt any good at it.”

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