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Photos: Boston’s Running Community Gathers Around Marathon Sports

Full Story: Marathon Sports, A Boston Landmark, Becomes An Improvised Memorial

. For his customers and colleagues, Marathon Sports manager Shane O'Hara has been part motivator, part coach and part running buddy for years -- long before a bomb exploded just outside his Boylston Street storefront. Here, O’Hara helps Tommy Marincic with his reflective running vest before heading out with Marathon Sports’ Wednesday night running group. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

For his customers and colleagues, Marathon Sports manager Shane O’Hara has been part motivator, part coach and part running buddy for years — long before a bomb exploded just outside his Boylston Street storefront. Here, O’Hara helps Tommy Marincic with his reflective running vest before heading out with Marathon Sports’ Wednesday night running group. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

The store has always been a bit of a runner’s icon, but since the bombing it’s become something of a magnet and a memorial. Here, Leanne Scorzoni, of Roxbury, tries on the official 2014 Boston Marathon jacket. This will be her first Boston Marathon. She’s running as part of the MGH Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Cancer Center team. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

The store has always been a bit of a runner’s icon, but since the bombing it’s become something of a magnet and a memorial. Here, Leanne Scorzoni, of Roxbury, tries on the official 2014 Boston Marathon jacket. This will be her first Boston Marathon. She’s running as part of the MGH Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Cancer Center team. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

When bombs exploded at the finish line of last year’s Boston Marathon, Marathon Sports was instantly transformed into a triage unit, with O’Hara, dazed but otherwise uninjured, ripping clothes off the racks to bandage those who were wounded. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

When bombs exploded at the finish line of last year’s Boston Marathon, Marathon Sports was instantly transformed into a triage unit, with O’Hara, dazed but otherwise uninjured, ripping clothes off the racks to bandage those who were wounded. Here, O’Hara stands below a Boston Strong jersey that was presented to him during the Red Sox World Series victory parade. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Aubrey Wasser of Brighton shops for new running shoes. In the months after the bombings, O’Hara says the store was as busy as it had ever been. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Aubrey Wasser, of Brighton, shops for new running shoes. In the months after the bombings, O’Hara says the store was as busy as it had ever been. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Runners arrive to participate in the Wednesday night running group. For many, running is a solitary endeavor. But on the Wednesday two weeks after the blasts, Marathon Sports' Wednesday night running group swelled to nearly 300. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Runners arrive to participate in the Wednesday night running group. For many, running is a solitary endeavor. But on the Wednesday two weeks after the blasts, the group swelled to nearly 300. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

O’Hara, center with hand up, joins members of the store’s Wednesday night running group on Boylston Street before they head out for their weekly run. “It’s a family on Wednesdays,” O’Hara says of the group. “You know them for week in and week out, in the snow, in the heat, whatever. It’s just a little family.”(Jesse Costa/WBUR)

O’Hara, center with hand up, joins members of the store’s Wednesday night running group on Boylston Street before they head out for their weekly run. “It’s a family on Wednesdays,” O’Hara says of the group. “You know them for week in and week out, in the snow, in the heat, whatever. It’s just a little family.”(Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Earler this month, O’Hara helped unveil “honor banners” that will hang on Boylston Street in front of Marathon Sports and Forum Restaurant, near where the two bombs exploded during last year’s marathon. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Last month, O’Hara helped unveil “honor banners” that will hang on Boylston Street in front of Marathon Sports and Forum Restaurant, near where the two bombs exploded during last year’s marathon. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

. Scorzoni and Dee Dee Chen of the MGH high five each other after realizing both are running the Boston Marathon to raise money for MGH. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Leanne Scorzoni and Dee Dee Chen high five each other after realizing they are both are running the Boston Marathon to raise money for MGH. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Runners come to ask advice on shoes, or to stock up on training odds and ends. Sometimes they just hang out. For O'Hara, the store -- its memories and its scars –- is an integral part of his healing. Here, Marla McKnight, of Boston, tries to decide between several pairs of running shoes.  (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Runners come to ask advice on shoes, or to stock up on training odds and ends. Sometimes they just hang out. For O’Hara, the store — its memories and its scars — is an integral part of his healing. Here, Marla McKnight, of Boston, tries to decide between several pairs of running shoes. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

O'Hara will run the Boston Marathon this year, not necessarily expecting a personal best time, but for a good time with thousands of his fellow runners, and for closure. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

O’Hara will run the Boston Marathon this year, not necessarily expecting a personal best time, but for a good time with thousands of his fellow runners, and for closure. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

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