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Photos: One Year Anniversary Of The Boston Marathon Bombings

A year after the Boston Marathon bombings, wreaths were placed at the sites where the two bombs exploded, and Bostonians gathered to remember the dead and injured in a tribute ceremony at the Hynes Convention Center. See full coverage of today’s events.

The flag is raised at the Boston Marathon finish line. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Survivors, officials, first responders and guests paused as a flag was raised at the Boston Marathon finish line during a tribute in honor of the one year anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings. (Charles Krupa/AP)

The crowd in Boylston Street observes a moment of silence at 2.49 p.m. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

The crowd on Boylston Street paused for a moment of silence at 2:49 p.m., the moment when the first bomb went off. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

The family if Martin Richard, the 8-year-old killed in the bombing, stood among officials during the tribute and moment of silence at the finish line. (Charles Krupa/AP)

The family of Martin Richard, the 8-year-old killed in the bombing, stood among officials during the tribute and moment of silence at the finish line. (Charles Krupa/AP)

A man observes a moment of silence at 2:49  in rememberance of those killed an injured in the Boston Marathon bombings. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

(Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Forum restaurant staff at Marathon ceremonies. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Olivia Savarino, center, hugged Christelle Pierre-Louis, left, as Callie Benjamin, right, looked on during ceremonies on Boylston Street. Savarino and Benjamin were working at the Forum restaurant when the bombs went off. (Steven Senne/AP)

Shane O'Hara, manager of Marathon Sports makes his way to the finish line ceremony. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Shane O’Hara, holding umbrella, manager of Marathon Sports, made his way to the finish line ceremony. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Those who attended the ceremony inside the Hynes Convention Center walked toward the Boston Marathon finish line to observe a moment of silence. (Elise Amendola/AP)

Those who attended the ceremony inside the Hynes Convention Center walked toward the Boston Marathon finish line to observe a moment of silence. (Elise Amendola/AP)

Vice President Joe Biden speaking at the Hynes Convention Center today. (The Tribute Committee)

At the tribute ceremony inside the convention center, Vice President Joe Biden told an audience of survivors and first responders “you have become the face of America’s resolve for the whole world to see.” (The Tribute Committee)

Patrick Downes who lost a leg in the bombing, speaking at the Hynes Convention Center. (The Tribute Committee)

Patrick Downes, who lost a leg in the bombing, was one of three survivors to speak during the ceremony. “We hope you feel all the emotion we feel when we say thank you,” he said. (The Tribute Committee)

Renese King and Keith Lockhart

Renese King sang as Keith Lockhart conducted the Boston Pops, one of many musical performances during the ceremony. (The Tribute Committee)

Tribute at the Hynes Convention Center. (The Tribute Committee)

The Boston Pops played at the beginning of the ceremony. (The Tribute Committee)

K-9 unit. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Security was tight along Boylston Street before the ceremony. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Yellow tulips at the Marathon finish line. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Many stopped by the finish line to pay their respects. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Police honor guard stands with a wreath. (Joe Spurr/WBUR)

Wreaths were placed at the site of each blast. Here, police honor guards stand with the wreath placed outside Forum, the site where the second bomb exploded. (Joe Spurr/WBUR)

A police honor guard and wreath. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

A police honor guard stands by a wreath near Marathon Sports, the site where the first bomb exploded. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Police on bikes cycle across the Boston Marathon finish on Boylston Street in Boston, Tuesday, April 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

Police on bikes patrolled the area of the finish line Tuesday. (Elise Amendola/AP)

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  • George Allegro

    If liberty’s greatest dangers lurk in its encroachment by well-meaning, yet ignorant, men of zeal, then today’s major domestic threats to liberty lie in the centralized powers of “expert” administrators.

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