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Daily Rounds: Kids Falling; Jump-Starting The Heart; Scramble For AIDS Cash; Will Health Reform Survive?

Thousands of kids in hospital for window falls | Reuters "Every year, more than 5,100 American kids go to the hospital with injuries from falling out of windows, and a quarter of them are serious enough for the child to be admitted, according to the first nationwide study of the dreaded problem." (uk.reuters.com)

When Not To Quit: Man Revived After 96 Minutes | WBUR & NPR "Last January a Minnesota man's heart stopped beating for an amazing 96 minutes. Emergency room doctors thought he was dead. But first responders who gave CPR on the scene decided not to give up, in part because of technology that allowed them to see their efforts were working. It's called capnography, and it measures how much carbon dioxide is being expelled with each breath. This information helps doctors and emergency medical personnel determine if a patient is hyperventilating or having a heart attack. It also helps them decide how to treat an asthma attack, or determine if CPR is working." (WBUR | 90.9 FM)

Mass. AIDS agencies scramble for funds - The Boston Globe "The agencies were notified by the state Department of Public Health this month that federal funding for AIDS prevention in Massachusetts would be cut by $4.3 million, roughly one-quarter of the state’s annual AIDS prevention budget. “We are in a budget crisis with our federal government, and it’s unlikely there will be additional resources,’’ said Philip Finch, vice president of development at Fenway Health, which is losing $100,000 in AIDS prevention funding because of the cuts. That’s about 20 percent of what it spends on prevention." (boston.com)

Will Health Care Reform Survive the Courts? - NYTimes.com "Health care spending now accounts for 16 percent of the national economy, yet 50 million Americans are uninsured. How strange if Congress were disempowered in this critical arena. We hope the court will show judicial restraint and let elected political leaders determine what health care reform should be." (nytimes.com)

This program aired on August 22, 2011. The audio for this program is not available.

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