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Event Date: Tuesday, March 15, 2016, 5:30 pm

WBUR Presents: Concrete Architecture and The New Boston

Heroic

Christopher Lydon, host of Open Source, will interview Mark Pasnik, Michael Kubo, and Chris Grimley, authors of “Heroic: Concrete Architecture and the New Boston,” to discuss how politics influenced urban renewal in Boston during the 1960s and how it’s influencing renewal in Boston today.

About “Heroic: Concrete Architecture and the New Boston”

As a worldwide phenomenon, building with concrete represents one of the major architectural movements of the postwar years, but in Boston it was deployed in more numerous and diverse civic, cultural, and academic projects than in any other major U.S. city. After decades of stagnation and corrupt leadership, public investment in Boston in the 1960s catalyzed enormous growth, resulting in a generation of bold buildings that shared a vocabulary of concrete modernism. Today, when concrete buildings across the nation are in danger of insensitive renovation or demolition, “Heroic: Concrete Architecture and the New Boston” presents the concrete structures that defined Boston during this remarkable period—from the well-known (Boston City Hall, New England Aquarium, and cornerstones of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University) to the already lost (Mary Otis Stevens and Thomas F. McNulty’s concrete Lincoln House and Studio; Sert, Jackson & Associates’ Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary School)—with hundreds of images; essays by architectural historians Joan Ockman, Lizabeth Cohen, Keith N. Morgan, and Douglass Shand-Tucci; and interviews with a number of the architects themselves.

This event free and open to the public, but advanced registration is required. Refreshments will be served!

Click here to register.

Event Location:

Boston City Hall, 3rd Floor Lobby

1 City Hall Square  Boston, MA

Please enter from the 1st floor entrance located at Congress Street near Faneuil Hall.

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