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#NPRreads: Leaving Guantanamo, And Why Black People Don't Call Police

For this weekend, we recommend pieces that touch on what's happened to some of the prisoners released from Guantanamo and an essay from one of India's few foreign correspondents.

All Things Considered

Southern Baptists Don't Shy Away From Talking About Their Racist Past

The denomination held a summit in Nashville, Tenn., this week to consider how the Gospel speaks to race relations. It wasn't easy, and moving from words to actions may be a challenge.

Jury Rules Against Ellen Pao, Clearing Kleiner Perkins Of Discrimination

The case was the highest-profile gender discrimination case to come out of Silicon Valley. Pao had sued her former employers for $16 million in damages.

Italy's Highest Court Overturns Amanda Knox Conviction

The decision puts an end to a story that began in 2009 when Knox was found guilty of murdering 21-year-old Meredith Kirchner two years earlier.

All Things Considered

Nostalgic Cars: Sour Automotive Fruit Of Cuban Embargo Gets New Life

In Havana, Cuba, the old cars that crowd the streets used to symbolize a stagnant nation. Now enterprising Cubans have begun renting cars out to tourists who are hungry for the cars of their youth.

Thai Ruler Says He's Prepared To End Martial Law

Prime Minister Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha, who seized power last May, says he will lift martial law and replace it with a constitutional provision that gives him the very same powers.

Yemen's Turmoil Sparks Big Swings In The Global Oil Market

Yemen is minor producer of crude oil but controls a strategic energy waterway. More than 3.8 million barrels a day pass through the Bab el-Mandeb Strait at the southern entrance to the Red Sea.

All Things Considered

LISTEN: A Cuban Protest Singer On The State Of U.S.-Cuba Relations

For decades, Carlos Varela has doled out incisive criticism of the Cuban government. On our recent visit to Havana, he sang a song he says reflects the mood of the country at this historic moment.

After A Tough Election, Israel's Netanyahu Looks To Ease Tensions

The Israeli leader ruffled feathers during the bruising campaign. Since then, he has sought to make amends. In the latest move, Israel is handing over money it had withheld from the Palestinians.

App That Aims To Make Books 'Squeaky Clean' Draws Ire From Edited Writers

Clean Reader — an app designed to find, block and replace profanity in books — has drawn considerable criticism from authors. This week, makers of the app announced they would no longer sell e-books.

Our Week In The Web: March 27, 2015

March 27, 2015
This image of fries and sauce was the last bit of social media beloved East Village Belgian fry stand Pommes Frites shared before Thursday's massive building collapse in New York City. The shop hopes to reopen sometime in the future. (Pommes Frites / Twitter)

More on the incessant email debate, plus some goats living their best lives and the sad allure of Manhattan’s shuttered Pommes Frites.

Mobile Payments Offer Convenience If You Keep Your Email Safe

March 26, 2015
mobilepay

Thinking about moving your wallet to your phone? You can! And maybe you should? But TechCrunch senior writer Josh Constine has a few things to tell you before you do.

Using Technology To Get Your Kids Outside

March 26, 2015
A view of winter constellations on a starry, clear night. (Phillip Chee / Flickr)

The latest and greatest — using apps to make natural exploration more fun for your kids.

Our Week In The Web: March 20, 2015

March 20, 2015
U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, a tea party favorite and possible presidential candidate in 2016, speaks to Baily Ealy during a Strafford County Republican Committee Chili and Chat on Sunday, March 15, 2015, in Barrington, N.H. (AP)

The emailed comments question continues to haunt us, we shake off / salute our haters and CNN Politics spends way too much time on FinalCut (in a good way!).

Laurence Kotlikoff Answers Your Social Security Questions

March 19, 2015

You asked, Laurence Kotlikoff answered — your Social Security questions detailed in brief.

Musicologist Who Testified In ‘Blurred Lines’ Trial Explains Her Case

March 18, 2015

“It is important to remember there are no virgin births in music and the other creative arts.” Musicologist Sandy Wilbur, who testified in the recent copyright trial in Los Angeles, explains the “Blurred Lines” case.

More Famous Music Copyright Cases

March 17, 2015

“Blurred Lines” and “Got To Give It Up” aren’t the only two songs to be subject to public controversy over intellectual property rights. Other examples abound.

Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND) On Anti-Trafficking Opposition In Congress

March 16, 2015
In this file photo, Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., and other members of the Democratic caucus file out of a strategy session on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014. (AP)

US Senator Heidi Heitkmap (D-ND) discusses her work on a variety of anti-trafficking bills currently stalled in the US Senate.

An On Point Producer Says Goodbye: Sam Gale Rosen

March 13, 2015
sputnik

Longtime On Point Radio producer Sam Gale Rosen leaves us here for greener, more Vermont-esque pastures. He shares what he learned — and some of his favorite shows — while working here.

Our Week In The Web: March 13, 2015

March 13, 2015
A poster for the upcoming movie Sharknado. (The Asylum)

How should we capture your after-hours comments, and where should we put them after we have them? Some thoughts.

More From Nico Muhly

March 11, 2015
Composer Nico Muhly. (Courtesy the Artist)

Want to listen to and watch Nico Muhly, and not sure where you should start? Don’t worry: we’ve got some ideas.

The 14 Best Cookbooks Of 2014

December 10, 2014
Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst has compiled a list (and pile) of the best cookbooks of 2014. (Kathy Gunst)

Here & Now resident chef and cookbook author Kathy Gunst shares her list of the best cookbooks of the year.

Boston Marathon Issues 450 Special Entries

December 5, 2013
The finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon, before the race began. (Facebook)

The organizers of the Boston Marathon have issued special invitations to 450 people who made the case they were profoundly affected by the bombings in April.

Tracing My Father’s WWII Experience

November 11, 2013
Raymond Allen Ashlock

There were 16 million Americans in uniform during World War II. One of them was my father, Raymond Allen Ashlock.

A Special Saturday At The Massachusetts National Cemetery

November 9, 2013
More than 2,000 people planted flags by graves at the Massachusetts National Cemetery on Cape Cod on Saturday. (Alex Ashlock/Here & Now)

The first Operation Flags For Vets attracted a few hundred people. On Saturday there must have been more than 2,000.

3 World Series Palindromes

October 23, 2013
The Red Sox are scheduled to host the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 1 of baseball's World Series on Wednesday. A rainbow above Fenway Park is pictured on Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013, in Boston. (Charles Krupa/AP)

Our friend and master palindromist Barry Duncan shared with us three palindromes inspired by the World Series — including one for each team.

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