Books

'Ello' Aims For A Return To Ad-Free Social Networking

Ello is the viral social network of the moment. Ad free, invite only and with the option of anonymity, it's generating tons of chatter as the latest alternative to Facebook.

From Kale To Pale Ale, A Love of Bitter May Be In Your Genes

Researchers have found a gene that affects how strongly you experience bitter flavors. And those who aren't as sensitive eat about 200 more servings of vegetables per year.

Baseball's AL Wild-Card Game Was Indeed Wild

The Royals move on to the American League Division Series after beating the Athletics 9-8 on Tuesday night. It was the Royals first appearance in a postseason game in 29 years.

FCC Votes To Eliminate Sports Blackout Rules

Unfortunately for sports fans, the rules aren't expected to change much, as the NFL could still negotiate blackout rules through contracts with broadcasters. It does, however, end FCC protection.

All Things Considered

Where Activists See Gray, Albuquerque Police See Black And White

If a suspect threatens officers, police say they have a right to defend themselves. But a Justice Department report said the police in Albuquerque have used force unnecessarily; two ex-officers agree.

First U.S. Case Of Ebola Confirmed In Dallas

A man who flew to the U.S. from Liberia has tested positive for Ebola. He was not sick on the plane, but developed symptoms later. He is currently in isolation at a hospital in Dallas.

New York Boosts Pay For Thousands With Hourly Wage Hike

Mayor Bill de Blasio signed an executive order Tuesday that raises the hourly rate from under $11.90 to $13.13 an hour for thousands of fast-food and retail workers.

BRAIN Initiative Bets on Wearable Scanners, Laser-Controlled Cells

A wearable PET scanner and lasers that could control individual brain circuits are among the projects funded by a $46 million federal effort to accelerate research on the human brain.

All Things Considered

EBay Spins Off PayPal Into Fast-Changing World Of Mobile Payments

Commerce and payments are splitting up. Ebay is breaking away from PayPal and its payments operation will turn into a separate, publicly traded company.

Contractor With Criminal History And Gun Was Allowed On Elevator With Obama

The security lapse happened when President Obama visited the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. The incident continues to raise questions about the Secret Service's efficacy.

“Latino America”: The Politics Of A Population Boom

October 1, 2014
Actress Eva Longoria, center, Henry R. Munoz III, co-founder of the Latino Victory Project, left, and Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, are seated at an event launching The Latino Victory Project, a Latino political action committee, at the National Press Club in Washington, Monday, May 5, 2014. (AP)

Latino America. It is very large and growing very fast. How will it move the country?

Transcript: Peter Thiel Wants Us All To Go From ‘Zero To One’

September 30, 2014
The cover of Peter Thiel's new book, "Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How To Build the Future." (Courtesy Crown Business)

Entrepreneur Peter Thiel on innovation, technological failure and humanity’s uncertain future.

Medieval Mystery Novel Out In Paperback

September 30, 2014
Bruce Holsinger, a medieval scholar at UVA, is the author of "A Burnable Book." (Daniel Addison)

English professor Bruce Holsinger’s medieval mystery novel is out in paperback, and features Geoffrey Chaucer.

How To Avoid A Fully Automated Future

September 30, 2014
In this Jan. 15, 2013, photo, Rosser Pryor, Co-owner and President of Factory Automation Systems, examines a new high-performance industrial robot at the company's Atlanta facility.  (AP)

Nicholas Carr says automation, all over, is turning us into zombies. Out of touch with the world. He’s with us.

Methodist Pastor Faces Last Church Trial

September 29, 2014
Former United Methodist pastor Frank Schaefer speaks with reporters after a news conference, Thursday, Dec. 19, 2013, at First United Methodist Church of Germantown in Philadelphia. (Matt Rourke/AP)

Reverend Frank Schaefer, who was defrocked for officiating his son’s same-sex marriage and later reinstated, awaits one more church trial. He writes about the experience in a new memoir.

Aristotle And The Invention Of Science

September 29, 2014
A 1597 map of Lesbos / Mytilene, Greece by Giacomo Franco. (Flickr / Creative Commons)

How Aristotle invented science. The great ancient Greek, and life on Earth.

Peter Thiel Thinks We All Can Do Better

September 29, 2014
In this March 8, 2012 file photo, Peter Thiel speaks in San Francisco. (AP)

Silicon Valley’s Peter Thiel; the entrepreneur, investor and the PayPal co-founder’s call for deep invention.

‘Draw In The Dunes’ Details Ryder Cup’s First Tie

September 27, 2014

In 1969, for the first time, the Ryder Cup ended in a tie, thanks in part to a gesture of sportsmanship by golfer Jack Nicklaus. Bill Littlefield speaks with author Neil Sagebiel about his new book, ‘Draw in the Dunes,’ which chronicles the tournament.

The Hard And Soft Rules Of Apple Cider

September 26, 2014
On Point host Tom Ashbrook raises a toast with a glass of fresh apple cider in the On Point studios. (Jesse Costa / WBUR)

All about hard cider. It’s all over these days. And sweet, fresh apple cider, too. We’ll look at the history and comeback.

Deborah Feingold Captures Intimate Moments With World’s Most Influential Musicians

September 25, 2014
1980 photograph of Prince by Deborah Feingold. (Courtesy Deborah Feingold)

We know musicians first through their sound, but there are faces behind the music that can tell us just as much about the artist.

The Real Story Of Playwright Tennessee Williams

September 25, 2014
Playwright Tennessee Williams attends a memorial service for poet Dylan Thomas in 1953. (Library of Congress)

Great American playwright Tennessee Williams’ battle for art and sanity – a big new biography brings his story alive.

Gregory Maguire Goes from ‘Wicked’ To Pre-Revolutionary Russia

September 24, 2014
Gregory Maguire's new book takes inspiration from Russian fairy tales, including Baba Yaga, the witch who lives in a house on chicken legs. (Qainat Khan/Here & Now)

The author of the “Wicked” books takes inspiration from Russian folklore in his new book, “Egg & Spoon.”

The Educated Sheep Of The Ivy League

September 24, 2014
An image from the Princeton University campus. (Instagram / @JessHeart23)

A loud complaint that some top American colleges are turning out “excellent sheep.” A sharp critique of the Ivy League.

The Lawyer Who Would ‘Stop At Nothing To Win’

September 23, 2014
Lawyer Steven Donziger, left, walks with his clients who are members of Ecuador's indigenous Cofan tribe to Federal Court in New York for their hearing with lawyers for Texaco Monday, Feb. 1, 1999. The Ecuadorian rainforest was polluted by Texaco oil drilling. (Adam Nadel/AP)

Paul Barrett’s new book chronicles a decades long environmental case to win compensation for Ecuador’s indigenous tribes, and the lawyer who waged it.

8 Ways To Introduce Buddhist Teachings To Your Work Life

September 22, 2014
Roy Lobdell an assistant councilor at law meditates during his lunch hour in the tower of the John Hancock Building in Boston on February 4, 1977. (AP)

Are you having a happy Monday? If not, you’re far from alone. For many, “happy Monday” sounds like an oxymoron. After all, it’s the start of another five days at work, where more than half of Americans say they are unhappy.

Demystifying The Islamic Veil

September 22, 2014
Pictured are women wearing veils walk in Barcelona, Spain in 2010. Sahar Amer discusses veiling in her new book, "What is Veiling?" The practice has been a hotly debated and misunderstood. (Manu Fernandez/AP)

Sahar Amer, an Islamic studies professor, takes a comparative cultural look at the hotly debated and misunderstood practice of veiling.

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