Economy

Blue Bell Widens Recall To All Of Its Products Over Listeria Worries

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called it "a complex and ongoing multistate outbreak of listeriosis occurring over an extended period of several years."

Morning Edition

3D Printers Are Changing The Way People Think About Manufacturing

At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, the future of manufacturing is taking shape. At the lab, 3D printers offer some unique design opportunities as well as interesting challenges.

Morning Edition

Universities Target MBA Programs Toward Professional Athletes

Pro football players can earn tens of millions of dollars in a career. Some schools are now catering to current and former athletes to show them how best to manage their money after they stop playing.

Morning Edition

Stories Behind This Year's Pulitzer Prize Winners

The 2015 Pulitzer Prizes were announced on Monday. Among the 22 winners were newspapers large and small. We report on three of the stories behind the winning coverage.

Morning Edition

Proposed Retirement Advice Rule Has Worrisome Loopholes, Experts Say

The Department of Labor has crafted a proposed rule to better protect Americans saving for retirement. But questions are already being raised about how effective the new measure would be.

Norway Becoming First Country To Eliminate FM Radio

The switch from analog to digital radio offers more channels at a fraction of the cost, the government says.

All Things Considered

At 50 Years Old, The Challenge To Keep Up With Moore's Law

Gordon Moore's observation on the exponential improvement in hardware has pushed computers to be faster, smaller and cheaper. But there may be a point where tech advancements outpace the theory.

All Things Considered

BP Oil Spill Anniversary Highlights Changes In Industry Safety Standards

Offshore oil industry safety standards have been scrutinized since the BP spill five years ago. It happened when an oil rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, causing over 3 billion barrels to gush out.

Appetite For Gulf Seafood Is Back, But The Crabs And Oysters Aren't

Five years after the BP oil spill, the public has stopped asking whether seafood from the Gulf is safe to eat. But now there's a supply issue, and fishermen worry about the future of their industry.

Japan, U.S. 'Close' To Major Deal

A 12-country trade agreement hinges on negotiations between Japan and the United States.

Millions Of ‘Boomerang Buyers’ Could Reshape Housing Market

April 20, 2015
Signs are seen outside a foreclosed home and a house for sale February 24, 2009 in North Las Vegas, Nevada. (Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

The first wave of millions of homeowners who lost their home to foreclosure may soon get back into buying real estate.

Drought Won’t Mean More Expensive Peaches

April 20, 2015
Peaches (alicehenneman/Flickr)

Agricultural economist Dan Sumner explains why the current drought in California will not increase produce prices.

Republicans Support Obama’s Fast-Track Authority For Asian Trade Deal

April 17, 2015
U.S. House of Representatives Ways and Means Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (third from right) talks with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (third from right) on Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and other issues at the start of talks at the latter's official residence in Tokyo in Tokyo on February 19, 2015. (Kimimasa Mayama/AFP/Getty Images)

The support from Republicans puts the president in an awkward situation. Many Democrats say the deal would hurt American workers.

Rand Paul, Bitcoin And A New Frontier In Campaign Finance Loopholes

April 17, 2015
Presidential candidate Rand Paul's decision to accept bitcoin speaks to his hip, edgy, libertarian side -- but it also raises important concerns because the virtual currency is untraceable. Paul is pictured here on April 11, 2015, in Las Vegas. (John Locher/AP)

Presidential candidate Rand Paul’s decision to accept bitcoin speaks to his hip, edgy, libertarian side — but it also raises important concerns because the virtual currency is untraceable.

Open The Books: Why Pay Secrecy Needs To End

April 17, 2015
There are many reasons two people working at the same job might be paid differently, but to understand what those reasons are begins with transparency. MariusBoatca/flickr)

There are many reasons two people working at the same job might be paid differently, but to understand what those reasons are begins with transparency.

Mass. Adds 10,500 Jobs In March; Unemployment Rate Down To 4.8 Percent

April 16, 2015

Massachusetts’ strong job growth occurred in a month in which national jobs figures fell short of expectations.

Reporters’ Notebook: The Business Stories We Should Be Thinking About

April 15, 2015
The Empire State building and the skyline of Manhattan is viewed from one of the top floors of the newly built Four Seasons private residences at 30 Park Place on January 21, 2015 in New York City. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

CNN’s Maggie Lake, CBS’s Jill Schlesinger and The Atlantic’s Derek Thompson discuss the most important stories they’re covering.

The Biggest Smallest Tax: Or, Making The Case For A ‘Robin Hood Tax’

April 15, 2015
Advocates say a Financial Transaction Tax could raise $300 billion annually from U.S. markets. So why aren't we doing it? In this photo, an activist gestures to his pin during a demonstration calling for a "Robin Hood" tax on financial transactions in front of the former Stock Exchange building in Paris, Thursday, Feb. 17, 2011. (Francois Mori/AP)

Advocates say a Financial Transaction Tax could raise $300 billion annually from U.S. markets. So why aren’t we doing it?

Marchers Seek Higher Wages, ‘Fight For $15′ In Boston Rally

April 14, 2015
Protesters display placards and chant slogans during a rally, Tuesday, April 14, 2015, in Boston. Organizers of the event are calling for the nation's lowest paid workers to earn at least $15 per hour. (Steven Senne/AP)

Several hundred people, including college students, fast-food restaurant employees and other workers gathered for a rally to hike wages for the nation’s lowest paid workers to at least $15 per hour on Tuesday afternoon at Forsyth Park near Northeastern University.

The Gender Wage Gap Is Much More Troubling Than We Thought

April 14, 2015
New research indicates that men are earning significantly more even in traditionally female-dominated professions like nursing. (COMSALUD/flickr)

New research indicates that men are earning significantly more even in traditionally female-dominated professions like nursing.

Study: Majority Receiving Public Assistance Are Working Poor

April 13, 2015
Nelson Mejia, who began as a full time employee two weeks ago, works at the food court in a Target on August 5, 2011 in Miami, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

The report says low-wage jobs have left taxpayers holding the tab for higher medicaid, food stamp and child subsidy payouts.

Cuba Eyes Economic Gain With Thaw In U.S. Relations

April 13, 2015
Cuba's President Raul Castro speaks during a meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama on the sidelines of the Summit of the Americas at the ATLAPA Convention center on April 11, 2015 in Panama City. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

President Obama and Cuban leader Raul Castro made history this weekend when they sat down together in Panama.

The One-Hour Freelancer

April 13, 2015

For people looking for work, online services can connect them with freelance jobs. But there’s a catch: the job may last only an hour.

Gov. Baker’s 2016 Budget Will Hurt The State’s Poorest Children And Schools

April 13, 2015
Mary Battenfeld: "Budgets contain more than numbers. They tell the story of who we are and what we care about. Right now, the story features inadequate funding for 200,000 Massachusetts children who live in poverty. " Pictured: Gov. Charlie Baker smiles as he unveils his 2016 budget proposal during a news conference at the State House in Boston, March 4, 2015. (Charles Krupa/AP)

Budgets contain more than numbers. They tell the story of who we are and what we care about. Right now, the story features inadequate funding for 200,000 Massachusetts children who live in poverty. 

Obama And Raul Castro Speak By Phone

April 10, 2015
Cuban President Raul Castro listens to Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro (not in frame), during the ALBA Summit at the Miraflores Palace, in Caracas on March 17, 2015. (Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s just the second time in more than 50 years that the leaders of the U.S. and Cuba are known to have spoken.

New Report Discusses How To Get The MBTA ‘Back On Track’

April 9, 2015
An MBTA Employee walks along the platform next to an idle transit train at the Leachmere T station in Cambridge on Feb. 10, 2015. (Josh Reynolds/AP)

We discuss a new report that describes how to transform the MBTA.

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