Economy
All Things Considered

Legal Moves Might Mean Fiscal Relief, And More PR Troubles, For GM

General Motors is signaling its plans to ask a bankruptcy judge for protection from lawsuits related to a defective switch recall. This could further complicate its current public relations crisis.

Tasting With Our Eyes: Why Bright Blue Chicken Looks So Strange

The color of food can affect how we perceive its taste, and food companies aren't afraid to use that to their advantage. An artist tests perceptions by dousing familiar foods with unorthodox colors.

Weekly Innovation: Better Luggage Checking ... And Tracking

Air France and KLM have developed two gadgets — the eTrack and the eTag — that let you drop off your bag without checking it with an agent and track it during your trip.

Morning Edition

Tremendously Gratifying To Win 2 Pulitzers, 'Post' Editor Says

After years of circulation declines and painful staffing cuts, this year's two Pulitzer Prizes are especially sweet. David Greene talks to Marty Baron, the executive editor for The Washington Post.

Morning Edition

Pension Deal Would Help Detroit Climb Out Of Bankruptcy

The city has reached a tentative agreement with retired police officers and firefighters to preserve their pensions. Pensions of other city retirees would take a 4.5 percent hit.

Morning Edition

How One Michigan City Is Sending Kids To College Tuition-Free

In 2005, a group of anonymous donors in Kalamazoo launched a bold program. It pays for graduates of the city's public schools to attend any of Michigan's public universities or community colleges.

Morning Edition

As La. Coast Recedes, Battle Rages Over Who Should Pay

A flood protection authority is suing to try to hold the oil and gas industries responsible for Louisiana's land crisis. But policymakers are trying to stop the lawsuit, saying it's bad for business.

All Things Considered

Sending Money On An Overseas Round Trip To Avoid Taxes

Some investors avoid paying taxes in a move called round-tripping — shifting money offshore, then investing it in U.S. stocks or bonds. A study estimates it costs the U.S. billions in lost revenues.

Think You Can Mail Your Taxes At Midnight? Think Again, Gramps

Back in the day — say, up until about a decade or so ago — the big news on April 15 was always about last-minute filers lining up at post offices as the clock ticked down. Now? It's a different story.

WATCH: Israel's New Low-Cost Airline Has Catchy Safety Video

The safety message is described as a "sort of cross between a Ricky Martin video, mixed with Devo's 'Whip It' and a heaping spoonful of Robert Palmer's 'Simply Irresistible.' "

Legal Arguments Filed In Casino Referendum Appeal

April 16, 2014

BOSTON — Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley is defending her decision to exclude from the November ballot a voter referendum calling for repeal of the state’s 2011 gambling law.

Slow Start To Spring Housing Market

April 16, 2014

Usually as the weather heats up, so does the U.S. housing market. However, it appears the spring selling season is off to a slow start.

Who Wins, Loses In Social Spending

April 16, 2014

Washington Post opinion columnist Catherine Rampell recently sparked a heated debate about government social spending. She joins us.

Tensions Build In San Francisco Amid Tech Boom

April 16, 2014
Members of the Housing Rights Committee of San Francisco and other activists protest outside of City Hall in San Francisco, Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014. San Francisco officials are set to vote on a plan to start regulating employee shuttles for companies like Google, Facebook and Apple, charging a fee for those that use public bus stops and controlling where they load and unload. Private shuttle buses have created traffic problems, blocking public bus stops during peak commute hours. (Jeff Chiu/AP)

As San Francisco experiences a historic economic boom, some activists say not all city residents are reaping the benefits.

Is China Heading Towards A Housing Bust?

April 15, 2014

In Chinese “ghost cities,” 20-story high rises have only a few occupants and developers are offering discounts as high as 40 percent.

What’s Behind The Nasdaq Biotech Sell-Off

April 14, 2014

The Nasdaq fell 3 percent and on Friday it fell again. Many are nervous that we could be in the middle of a tech bubble.

A Gallon Of Gas In Massachusetts Up A Penny

April 14, 2014

BOSTON — AAA Southern New England reports Monday that a gallon of self-serve, regular is up to an average of $5.53 per gallon.

You Don't Think Federal Tax Law Is Funny? Think Again

April 14, 2014
Just in time for Tax Day, a look at why the Internal Revenue Code is unintentionally hilarious. (J. David Ake/AP)

Just in time for Tax Day, a look at why the Internal Revenue Code is unintentionally hilarious.

Everett Landowner Resists Casino Disclosure Pledge

April 11, 2014

BOSTON — One of the owners of land in Everett that Steve Wynn wants to buy to build a casino is refusing to sign a promise that no secret owners would profit from the sale.

Inside The World Of Fast Fashion

April 11, 2014
Buildings are reflected in a Forever 21 storefront in Washington, D.C. Forever 21 is the largest fast fashion retailer based in the U.S. (vpickering/Flickr)

New styles go from runway to retailer at warp speed. We look at the impact of “fast fashion” and who’s behind it.

Country’s Biggest Bitcoin ‘Mine’ Found In Small Central Wash. City

April 10, 2014
MegaBigPower CEO Dave Carlson inside North America's biggest bitcoin "mine." (Tom Banse/Northwest News Network

One of the world’s largest creators of the online currency is located in the outskirts of Wenatchee, Washington.

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