Education
Morning Edition

A Nearly Recession-Proof City Is Not Slowing Down

The unemployment rate in Lincoln, Neb., is one of lowest in the U.S., thanks to a well-educated workforce. The focus now is on finding workers and keeping young people from leaving.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Teaching The Holocaust: New Approaches For A New Generation

This year, during the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the Nazi death camps, some teachers are placing more emphasis on creating lessons about "how Jews lived than about how they perished."

The Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, Longtime President Of Notre Dame University, Dies

Father Ted, as he was known to his friends, was influential in reshaping Catholic higher education. He was also a champion for civil rights and nuclear disarmament.

A Glut Of Ph.D.s Means Long Odds Of Getting Jobs

Only 1 in 5 Ph.D.s in science, engineering and health end up with faculty teaching or research positions within five years of completing their degrees. But universities keep churning them out.

Morning Edition

Colorado Pushes For Concealed Guns In K-12 Schools

Similar legislation has been proposed in North Dakota and Wyoming to allow concealed firearms on K-12 school grounds and college campuses, as a part of a larger effort to expand gun owners' rights.

5 Lessons Education Research Taught Us In 2014

Lessons from a handful of the most-viewed papers from the American Educational Research Association last year.

All Things Considered

Dissecting A Frog: A Middle School Rite Of Passage

In science classrooms across the country, middle-schoolers will take part in an iconic activity this year: frog dissection.

Preventing Suicide With A 'Contagion Of Strength'

A suicide prevention program trains middle and high school students as peer mentors — shaping school culture and behavior around pillars of support.

All Things Considered

College? Career Tech? In Nashville, Teens Do Both

Vocational education is enjoying a renaissance in many U.S. schools. In Nashville, Tenn., all high-schoolers are encouraged to take three career-training classes, regardless of college plans.

The Great U.S. History Battle

The College Board redesigned the framework for its Advanced Placement U.S. history course, and many conservative lawmakers aren't happy about it.

School Committee To Choose New Boston Schools Superintendent Tuesday

March 2, 2015
From left to right: Guadalupe Guerrero, Tommy Chang, Dana Bedden and Pedro Martinez. (Courtesy BPS)

Now that the final four candidates in the Boston Public School superintendent search have all been interviewed in public hearings last week, the Boston School Committee is scheduled to make a final decision Tuesday night. Here’s a look at the men vying for the job.

More Parents Say No To Standardized Testing

February 27, 2015
In this Feb. 12, 2015 photo, Yamarko Brown, age 12, works on math problems as part of a trial run of a new state assessment test at Annapolis Middle School in Annapolis, Md. (Patrick Semansky/AP)

A growing number of parents and students are deciding to “opt out” of assessment tests.

BU Fraternity Suspended For Misogynist Media Promoting ‘Blackout’ Party

February 26, 2015

Boston University withdrew its recognition of the Kappa Sigma fraternity, following its use of misogynist videos and photos to promote a party.

Visionaries: MIT’s Alan Guth Made A ‘Spectacular Realization’ About The Universe

February 26, 2015
MIT physicist Alan Guth's “inflation” is accepted as the most plausible explanation for the evolution of the universe. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Guth’s “cosmic inflation” is accepted as the most plausible explanation for the evolution of the universe.

What Winter 2015 Can Teach Us About Education

February 26, 2015
Hunter Gehlbach: This winter has tried my patience, strained my back and taught me more about ice dams than I ever cared to know. But these are the travails of real life. If our schools are to prepare us for these daily challenges, they must educate broadly. (Charles Krupa/AP)

This winter has tried my patience, strained my back and taught me more about ice dams than I ever cared to know. But these are the travails of real life. If our schools are to prepare us for these daily challenges, they must educate broadly.

Instead Of Snow Days, Time Off For Sandstorms, Volcanoes And More

February 25, 2015
Two young men walk through a dust and sand storm in the outskirts of the Saudi capital Riyadh on April 13, 2011. (Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images)

What do children in other countries get days off for? Kavitha Cardoza brings stories from Saudi Arabia, the Philippines, Ecuador and India.

Have Colleges Gone Too Far In Responding To Allegations Of Sexual Assault?

February 24, 2015
New students at San Diego State University watch a video on sexual consent during an orientation meeting in August 2014. (Gregory Bull/AP)

In a recent op-ed in The Boston Globe, criminal defense attorney and civil liberties lawyer Harvey Silverglate calls the “campus sexual assault panic one of the many runaway social epidemics in our nation’s history.”

View From The Top: A Wisconsin Student Council President

February 24, 2015
Sabrina Brasier is a president of the student council at Oconto Falls High School in Oconto, Wisconsin. (Facebook)

As part of our series of conversations with leaders, we speak with Sabrina Brasier, a senior at Oconto Falls High School.

Putting Time On Their Side: The Case For A Longer School Day

February 24, 2015
Jennifer Davis: In the 21st century, preparing students for success in higher education, careers and life takes more time than the traditional school calendar allows. (BES Photos/flickr)

In the 21st century, preparing students for success in higher education, careers and life takes more time than the traditional school calendar allows.

Former Gov. Patrick To Deliver Harvard Commencement Address

February 23, 2015
Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick completes the traditional "lone walk" down the stairs in front of the State House Wednesday. (Steven Senne/AP)

Deval Patrick, who left office last month after serving two terms and is now a visiting fellow at MIT, received both his bachelor’s and law degree from Harvard.

Boston Superintendent Finalists Face Public Interviews This Week

February 23, 2015

Each of the final four candidates will be in Boston this week for public interviews with various stakeholders, such as parents, students, teachers, school leaders and community partners.

Mass. Schools Weigh Options For Making Up Snow Days

February 22, 2015

As students return to classrooms on Monday, some districts may consider asking state education officials for a waiver from the state’s requirement of a 180-day school year.

Should Iranian Students Be Banned From Some Science Programs?

February 20, 2015
Virginia Commonwealth University is one of the schools that does not admit Iranian students to some science programs. (Jeff Auth/Wikimedia Commons)

At least two U.S. universities have official policies about not admitting Iranian international students to certain programs.

UMass Amherst To Ban Dorm Guests For ‘Blarney Blowout’ Weekend

February 19, 2015

The school’s temporary guest policy was adopted in an effort to avoid a repeat of last year’s rowdy off-campus St. Patrick’s Day-themed celebrations, which resulted in more than 70 arrests.

Testing The 'Wisconsin Idea' Of Public Higher Education

February 19, 2015
In this file photo, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker gives a commencement speech at Concordia University of Wisconsin Friday, May 16, 2014, in Mequon, Wis. (AP)

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker — Republican Presidential hopeful — wants to cut deep into his state’s prized public university system, and maybe its vision. We’ll hear the debate.

UMass Amherst Reverses Policy On Iranian Students

February 18, 2015

Wednesday’s announcement comes on the heels of the university’s decision last week to bar students from Iran in a move that officials said aligned school policy with U.S. sanctions against Iran.

Most Popular