Environment

New U.S. Rules Protect Giant Bluefin Tuna

To reduce the number of giant bluefin tuna killed by fishing fleets, the U.S. is putting out new rules about commercial fishing in the Gulf of Mexico and parts of the western Atlantic.

Weekend Edition Sunday

The Salmon Cannon: Easier Than Shooting Fish Out Of A Barrel

Alarmed by the rapid decline of wild salmon populations, a company has invented a novel way to help migratory fish over blocked rivers. It uses air pressure to fire them out of a cannon.

All Things Considered

Climate Policy Takes The Stage In Florida Governor's Race

Rick Scott, Florida's GOP governor, has come under criticism for his record on the environment. Now, he's rolling out his own proposals for safeguarding the state's water and wildlife preserves.

Morning Edition

As BP Pays For Oil Spill Impact, Some People Aren't Seeing The Cash

The oil giant is paying billions of dollars to businesses hurt by the 2010 spill, but won't pay business owners hurt by a government drilling moratorium that was put in place after the spill.

Morning Edition

Rats! New York City Tries To Drain Rodent 'Reservoirs'

Health officials want to reduce the rat population, so they're hiring extra exterminators, sealing up holes and teaching regular New Yorkers how to make homes and gardens less rat-friendly.

All Things Considered

Night Of The Cemetery Bats

And you thought cemeteries were for the dead. A nighttime census of leafy Bellefontaine in St. Louis reveals at least two species of bats. Parklike graveyards provide key habitat for urban wildlife.

Morning Edition

Colossal Dam Removal Project Frees Washington's Elwa River

Two dams blocked the river for more than 100 years. The lower dam is completely gone and the last 30 feet of the upper dam were blown up this week. Now, the river is returning to life.

Morning Edition

An Icy Solution To The Mystery Of The Slithering Stones

In the moonscape of Death Valley, one mystery stands out: boulders that seem to creep along the desert floor when nobody's looking. Thanks to video and GPS, scientists now think they know why.

All Things Considered

There's A Big Leak In America's Water Tower

Peaks around Glacier National Park store water that irrigates a large section of North America. But a warming climate is shrinking that snowpack, with ominous consequences for wildlife and people.

Morning Edition

Driven By Climate Change, Cotton Buyers Look For Alternatives

One clothing company whose bottom line was hurt in the wake of bad weather events decided to look to polyester fibers made from recycled plastic bottles.

How Humans Deal With A Changing Natural Environment

September 3, 2014
In this Fall 2013 photo provided by the University of Idaho, students in the University of Idaho’s first Semester in the Wild program take a class in the Frank Church-River Of No Return Wilderness, Idaho. (AP)

MacArthur “genius” Ruth DeFries looks at humanity’s long, deep integration with nature – and what comes next. She’s hopeful.

Wyoming Wind Power Has Nowhere To Go

September 1, 2014
High Plains Wind Farm near McFadden, Wyoming on a breezy summer day. (Inside Energy)

Leigh Paterson of Inside Energy reports on why transmission gridlocks are keeping so much western wind at bay.

Old Threats Persist For Loons On Lake Winnipesaukee

August 29, 2014
Biologist Melisa Leszik steers the boat while LPC Director Harry Vogel looks for loons. (Sean Hurley/NHPR)

Sean Hurley of New Hampshire Public Radio went along on an annual bird count to find out how the loons are doing.

Heavy Surf Pummels California’s Catalina Island

August 29, 2014
This image provided by Mean Advantage Productions shows damage left after Wednesday's storm on Catalina Island Thursday Aug. 28, 2014. Pummeled by high surf, the island was subjected to a third day of huge waves and dangerous rip currents as the area felt the ripple effects of Tropical Storm Marie churning off the Mexican coast. (Mean Advantage Productions via AP)

While many were excited for the surge of waves from Tropical Storm Marie, they had some devastating effects.

‘Enormous’ Growth Of Ocean Garbage Patch

August 28, 2014
Oceanographer Charles J. Moore found this garbage patch in 1997, but he says he's "shocked" by the amount of growth in the past 15 years. (Algalita Marine Research and Education)

The oceanographer who discovered the floating island of trash in 1997 says he’s shocked by how much it’s grown.

The State Of America's Wine Industry

August 28, 2014
Some of the hundreds of earthquake damaged wine barrels cover and toppled a pair of forklifts at the Kieu Hoang Winery, Monday, Aug. 25, 2014, in Napa, Calif. A powerful earthquake that struck the heart of California's wine country caught many people sound asleep, sending dressers, mirrors and pictures crashing down around them and toppling wine bottles in vineyards around the region. (AP)

Drought in California, earthquake in Napa. We look at broken bottles and the health of the American wine industry.

Duxbury Beach Cleared After Large Shark Sighted

August 25, 2014
Two people walk across a beach bridge in the warmth of a spring afternoon on Duxbury Beach in May 2014 in Duxbury, Mass. (Stephan Savoia/AP)

Like a scene from the movie “Jaws,” swimmers were ordered out of the water at the Duxbury town beach when a large shark was spotted near the shoreline.

Predicting When Turtles Will Hatch Could Help Outer Banks Economy

August 25, 2014
When a turtle nest is found, park rangers excavate the nest, inventory the eggs and mark out the nests with a 30-foot square enclosure. (National Park Service)

Park rangers at Cape Hatteras National Seashore hope electronic sensors will allow them to predict exactly when turtle eggs will hatch.

Earthquake Hits A Nerve In Napa

August 25, 2014
Eddie Villa uses a shovel to clean up wine bottles that were thrown from the shelves at Van's Liquors following a reported 6.0 earthquake on August 24, 2014 in Napa, California. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

As wine makers and sellers sweep up broken glass and survey the damage, we check in with KQED’s Mina Kim.

North Carolina Lawmakers Approve Plan For Coal Ash

August 21, 2014
Didi Fung, a contractor for the Environmental Protection Agency, collects water samples from the Dan River, Feb. 5, 2014, as state and federal environmental officials continued their investigations of a spill of coal ash into the Dan River in Eden, N.C. Documents and interviews collected by The Associated Press show how Duke’s lobbyists prodded Republican legislators to tuck a 330-word provision in a regulatory reform bill running nearly 60 single-spaced pages. Though the bill never once mentions coal ash, the change allowed Duke to avoid any costly cleanup of contaminated groundwater leaching from its unlined dumps toward rivers, lakes and the drinking wells of nearby homeowners. (Gerry Broome/AP)

Six months after a coal ash spill, state lawmakers have approved a plan to regulate the ashes left over from burning coal.

Bumper U.S. Corn Yield Could Top Records

August 20, 2014
Shoulder-high stalks are seen in a corn field July 5, 2006 in Prairie View, Illinois. (Tim Boyle/Getty Images)

Bryce Knorr of Farm Futures magazine says consumers can expect to see prices drop at the gas pump, but not at the grocery store.

Modern-Day Dust Bowl Isn’t Easy, But It Beats The 1930s

August 20, 2014
Farmer John Schweiser, 80, has had to take shelter from recent dust storms. He also lived through the Dust Bowl in the 1930s. (Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media)

It’s been drier on the American prairie than it was during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, but many farmers are surviving.

Why You Should Worry About The Butterflies

August 20, 2014
In this Oct. 21, 2013 file photo, a monarch butterfly lands on a confetti lantana plant in San Antonio. A half-century ago Monarch butterflies, tired, hungry and bursting to lay eggs, found plenty of nourishment flying across Texas. Native white-flowering balls of antelope milkweed covered grasslands, growing alongside nectar-filled wildflowers. But now, these orange-and-black winged butterflies find mostly buildings, manicured lawns and toxic, pesticide-filled plants. (AP)

This year’s monarch butterfly migration is the smallest ever recorded. We’ll ask why. It’s a big story. Plus: how climate change is creating new hybridized species.

MIT’s David Wilson On His Carbon Tax Proposal

August 19, 2014
An advocacy group in Massachusetts is proposing a revenue-neutral carbon tax that could potentially increase taxes on gas, but at the same time would reduce income and sales taxes. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

MIT Professor Emeritus David Wilson is credited with coming up with one of the earliest prototypes for a carbon tax.

Conservationists Urge Action As African Elephants Reach Tipping Point

August 19, 2014
A new study finds more African elephants are being killed each year than are being born. Pictured are elephants in Serengeti National Park in Tanzania, July 2014. (Karyn Miller-Medzon)

A study out this week says more African elephants are being killed each year than are being born.

Ospreys Have Fatal Attraction To Baling Twine, Fishing Line

August 18, 2014
This is how ospreys' unhealthy affinity for baling twine can kill. Idaho Fish and Game biologist Beth Waterbury rescued this osprey in the nick of time. (Beth Waterbury/Idaho Fish and Game)

Wildlife biologists in the northwestern U.S. are working with ranchers to keep the attractive nuisance out of the ospreys’ clutches.

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