Environment
All Things Considered

Saving The Amazon Will Take More Than Stopping Loggers

In order to save the Amazon, it's not enough for deforestation to stop; areas that have been denuded also need recuperation. A Brazilian research scientist has released a report with the World Wildlife Fund that suggested actions to curb the effect of humans on the world's largest rainforest.

Apps Aim To Guide You On 'Sustainable Food' (Whatever That Means)

Consumers who care about how their food is produced have a growing number of apps they can turn to at the supermarket. The problem? Nailing down just what sustainability means when it comes to food.

Who Should Pay To Fix The World's Salt-Damaged Soils?

The area of land no longer suitable for farming because of salt degradation is rising quickly. Scientists argue the private sector should help fund efforts to reverse it since it relies on the crops.

Why California's Drought-Stressed Fruit May Be Better For You

Is California's severe drought hurting the nutrient content of fruit? No, preliminary data on pomegranates suggest. The fruit may be smaller, but packed with more antioxidants, tests show.

All Things Considered

Coping In A Drier World: California's Drought Survival Strategy

The dearth of water in this state is showing no signs of easing. Officials have introduced plans to revamp the water rationing and distribution systems until the rains come. If they ever come.

All Things Considered

Why Are The Great Lakes On The Rise?

Host Audie Cornish talks with Drew Gronewold, a hydrologist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, about why water levels in lakes Superior, Michigan and Huron are rising.

Weekend Edition Sunday

The Kissimmee: A River Re-Curved

In Florida, a key river is undergoing the largest environmental restoration effort in the world. But when complete, a looming water shortage means the river's waters still face an uncertain future.

Predictions Of 'Peak Oil' Production Prove Slippery

Just a few years ago, authors were predicting production would soon hit a peak and then decline. But since then, supplies have surged. So are the forecasters now slapping themselves in the head?

Do We Need A New 'Environmental Impact' Label For Beef?

Labels like "organic" and "grass-fed" don't capture the beef industry's true environmental impact, researchers say. Why not have a label that assesses water use, land use and greenhouse gas emissions?

New GMOs Get A Regulatory Green Light, With A Hint Of Yellow

Farmers will be able to plant types of corn and soybeans that can tolerate doses of two weedkillers. It may be one of the most significant developments the world of weedkilling in more than a decade.

Soylent Isn't People; But Is It The End Of Food?

October 30, 2014
Soylent is a new meal-replacement substance meant to offer a complete nutritional alternative to traditional food. (Courtesy Soylent)

Soylent is a grey smoothie the consistency of pancake batter that claims it can replace all your food. On a crowded planet, is this the future of food? Plus: what does the Antares rocket crash mean for private space travel?

Walsh: Boston Preparing For Climate Change

October 29, 2014

Mayor Marty Walsh says Boston has made significant strides in preparing for major natural disasters, rising sea levels and other impacts to the ever-changing climate on the two-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy.

Lava Threatens Homes On Hawaii’s Big Island

October 29, 2014
Lava has pushed through a fence marking a property boundary above the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii. (U.S. Geological Survey via AP)

Residents of Pahoa Village are evacuating, as smoke billows towards their homes and lava from Kilauea volcano creeps closer.

On Superstorm Sandy Anniversary, Red Cross Under Scrutiny

October 29, 2014
In the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, a former Red Cross official says, as many as 40 percent of the organization's emergency vehicles were assigned for public relations purposes. This photo, which shows one of the trucks in Long Island, N.Y., in January 2013, is one example of the many publicity photos taken by the Red Cross. (Les Stone/American Red Cross)

An investigation by NPR and ProPublica has uncovered serious problems with the charity’s response to the storm.

A Public Lands Controversy In The Great American West

October 29, 2014
In this Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013 image provided by the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, a young bear is rescued from drowning after eluding officials, at Lake Powell, Utah. (AP)

A big debate in the West over transferring Federal public lands to states. We’ll hear from both sides.

Hurricane Ana Remnants Lash Pacific Northwest

October 28, 2014

It’s been decades since remnants of a hurricane hit Oregon and Washington state, but that’s what is happening today.

Cartels Can Make Fracking In Mexico Expensive And Dangerous

October 28, 2014
Earlier this month, ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson visited Mexico City to discuss Mexico’s energy reforms with members of President Enrique Peña Nieto’s government. (David Brown/Greater Houston Partnership)

Texas oil companies could make a fortune in Mexico, but there’s a catch: the shale plays are located in states overrun by organized crime.

Why Are Electricity Prices Expected To Skyrocket In New England This Winter?

October 27, 2014
Peggy Udden, of Norwood, Mass., shovels her driveway in Norwood, Feb. 5, 2014. (Steven Senne/AP)

New England families planning their heating budget for the coming winter might be in for a cold shock.

Forum Highlights How Mass. Aims To Reduce Carbon Emissions

October 24, 2014

In the absence of action by Congress on climate change, Massachusetts officials are pressing ahead to reduce the state’s carbon footprint and are plan for sea level rise.

Coal Mining Threatens The Great Barrier Reef

October 24, 2014
A photo taken on September 22, 2014, shows fish swimming through the coral on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. (William West/AFP/Getty Images)

The reef is an underwater wonderland, but it’s facing multiple threats. Among them: the coal industry on Australia’s coast.

Bottom Of The Sea Is ‘A World Of Surprises’

October 23, 2014
Boulder brain coral off the southwest coast of St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands. Red lights from the ROV shining on the coral help scientists estimate its size. (NOAA)

The world’s oceans cover nearly two-thirds of the Earth’s surface, yet little is understood about the ocean floor.

The Country At The Epicenter Of The Ebola Outbreak

October 22, 2014
Health workers carry the body of a woman suspected of contracting the Ebola virus in Bomi county situated on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, Monday, Oct. 20, 2014. (AP)

We’ll go to Liberia, and hear from a pastor and a physician at the epicenter of the Ebola crisis.

Where We're Going, We'll Probably Still Need Cars

October 21, 2014
This undated image provided by Google, shows an early version of Google's prototype self-driving car. For the first time, California's Department of Motor Vehicles knows how many self-driving cars are traveling on the state's public roads. The agency is issuing permits, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014 that let three companies test 29 vehicles on highways and in neighborhoods. (AP)

The future of the car: from the fuels they’ll run on, to the materials they’ll be made of, to the computers that may drive them.

The 2014 Midterms: What Voters Really Care About

October 21, 2014
David Perdue, Michelle Nunn

Two weeks to go till Midterm Election Day. We’ll look at how the biggest issues are playing out around the country.

College Campuses Work To Reduce Their Carbon Footprints

October 20, 2014
Natural lighting, open spaces and chilled beams can be seen at the University of Minnesota, Morris. (Courtesy)

The University of Minnesota, Morris, is among the universities working toward a goal of total carbon neutrality.

Bermuda Resident Says She Is Not Fazed By Hurricane Gonzalo

October 17, 2014
Hurricane Gonzalo as seen by the International Space Station by European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst on Oct. 16, 2014. (NASA)

Hurricane Gonzalo is expected to batter Bermuda with hurricane-force winds for eight hours. That doesn’t bother longtime Bermuda resident Juliette Jackson.

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