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All Things Considered

Coping In A Drier World: California's Drought Survival Strategy

The dearth of water in this state is showing no signs of easing. Officials have introduced plans to revamp the water rationing and distribution systems until the rains come. If they ever come.

Drones Are Taking Pictures That Could Demystify A Malaria Surge

How is a rare strain of malaria spreading near cities in Southeast Asia? That's the question that's been puzzling a team of scientists. And they're using drones to find the answer.

All Things Considered

Bigger Than A T.Rex, With A Duck's Bill, Huge Arms And A Hump

Scientists first figured the claw-tipped, giant arm bones found in 1965 belonged to an ostrich-like dinosaur. But its recently recovered skull looks more like a dino designed by a committee — of kids.

All Things Considered

Cloud Data Security Concerns Raised After Reported Attack In China

A group says the Chinese government backed an attack against users of Apple's iCloud service. Experts worry attacks that target weaknesses in the transfer of data on the cloud will become more common.

All Things Considered

Surrogacy Storm In Thailand: A Rejected Baby, A Busy Babymaker

Two controversial cases have put surrogacy in Thailand in the spotlight. Now the government is drafting new laws to stop abuse.

NHTSA Adds More Than 3 Million Vehicles To Air Bag Recall

Almost 8 million vehicles are now being recalled over worries their air bags could malfunction. Vehicle owners in hot and humid climates are under special alert.

Poll: Broad Support In U.S. For Ebola Travel Ban

An NPR poll finds a clear majority of Americans are worried about Ebola. Fifty-six percent of people are either "very concerned" or "somewhat concerned" about the spread of the Ebola virus to the U.S.

Glow-In-The-Dark Treats To Light Up Your Halloween

Two entrepreneurs have developed new tricks to make food that's literally illuminating, using ingredients that are as natural and unprocessed as possible. It's just basic food chemistry, folks.

All Things Considered

High In The Andes, Bolivia's Gondolas In The Sky Ease Congestion

One of Latin America's poorest countries is building the world's longest urban cable car system. The aim is to transform the lives of commuters who battle chronic traffic problems.

A 45,000-Year-Old Leg Bone Reveals The Oldest Human Genome Yet

The DNA in this ancient Siberian leg bone shows that the man had Neanderthal ancestors — yet more proof that humans and Neanderthals interbred. And he lived much farther north than expected.

#GamerGate And A Culture Clash In The Making

October 23, 2014
A screenshot from the interactive game, "Depression Quest," the game at the root of the ongoing #GamerGate controversy. (Courtesy  "Depression Quest")

#GamerGate. Sexism, misogyny and rough stuff in a video game world culture clash.

Rhode Island Journalist Heading Home After Ebola Recovery

October 22, 2014

Ashoka Mukpo, who had contracted the virus while working in Liberia as a freelance cameraman for NBC and other media outlets, was released from a Nebraska hospital’s biocontainment unit Wednesday morning.

Counting The Minutes: Perceptions Of Time In A Quantified Life

October 22, 2014
Sari Boren: "If we could know how much time we have left, how would we use it, and how would that change our perception of time?" (dave/flickr)

If we could know how much time we have left, how would we use it, and how would that change our perception of time?

Jim Gaffigan’s Love Affair With Food

October 21, 2014
Jim Gaffigan is a stand-up comedian, actor and author. His latest book is "Food: A Love Story." (Alan Gastelum)

The stand-up comic gives his particular gastronomic take on the world in his new memoir “Food: A Love Story.”

An E-Reader That ‘Beats Hardcovers’?

October 21, 2014
Amazon's new e reader, the Kindle Voyage has been getting rave reviews. (Amazon)

The Kindle Voyage has been getting rave reviews, with The New York Times saying “it offers the visual clarity of printed text.

Critical Care Nurse Writes Open Letter To Ebola Nurse

October 21, 2014
When nurse Kati Kleber of Charlotte, North Carolina, wrote an open letter to Nina Pham, the first Texas nurse who contracted Ebola, it quickly went viral. (nurseeyeroll.com)

When Kati Kleber posted a letter of support for Nina Pham, the first Texas nurse who contracted Ebola, it quickly went viral among nurses.

Alternate Routes: Lasting Impressions From The Road

October 20, 2014
Rachel Rohr spent one month driving across the country, talking with young Americans ahead of the midterm elections. (Rachel Rohr/Here & Now)

Our digital and social media producer Rachel Rohr is back from a month-long trip cross-country, talking with young Americans.

HGTV Is A Hit With Affluent Women Viewers

October 20, 2014
Drew Scott (L) and Jonathan Scott of Property Brothers pose at HGTVs The Lodge at CMA Music Fest 2014 on June 7, 2014 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for HGTV)

Meredith Blake of the Los Angeles Times explains the channel’s recipe for success, and why it’s so popular among affluent women.

Heroin Use On The Rise In North Carolina

October 20, 2014
There were 183 heroin overdose deaths in North Carolina last year. (thomasmartinsen/Flickr)

More and more Americans are dying from heroin overdoses. We take a look at North Carolina, where 183 people died from the drug last year.

Mario Batali Goes Farm To Table

October 20, 2014
Mario Batali's latest cookbook is "America - Farm to Table." (Kelly Campbell)

The chef and restaurateur discusses the “farm to table” trend and shares recipes with a hearty and rustic twist.

Be Afraid: We Have Nothing To Fear But Fear Itself

October 20, 2014
In this Oct. 2, 2014 photo, patrons line up for “Nightmare: New York,” a haunted house attraction in New York. (AP)

Afraid of snakes? Heights? Ebola? We’ll unpack the science of fear.

Not A Funeral: Portraits Of Gloucester’s Working Waterfront

October 20, 2014
(From “Portraits of a Working Waterfront” by Jim Hooper, courtesy of the Cape Ann Museum)

Photographer Jim Hooper’s “Portraits of a Working Waterfront” series celebrates the faces, families and stories behind Gloucester’s struggling fishing industry.

John Grisham Is Right: Looking Isn’t The Same As Touching

October 20, 2014
Wendy Kaminer: "Why was Grisham’s criticism of child porn sentencing laws so widely and reflexively condemned? Why was he pressured into offering an apology?" Pictured: Author John Grisham, who said that the United States is handing out unduly harsh prison  sentences for child pornography offenses to men who probably just had too much to drink and "pushed the wrong buttons." (Jose Luis Magana/AP)

Why was Grisham’s criticism of child porn sentencing laws so widely and reflexively condemned? Why was he pressured into offering an apology?

Ex-Massachusetts Episcopalian Bishop Shaw Dies

October 18, 2014

Thomas Shaw, a gay monk who served as bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts for nearly two decades and championed Palestinian, minority and other causes, has died. He was 69.

Week In The News: Market Mess, Ebola Alarm, Election Hits The Home Stretch

October 17, 2014
U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R) Ky., center, and Democratic opponent, Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes, rehearsed with host Bill Goodman before their appearance on "Kentucky Tonight" television broadcast live from KET studios in Lexington, Ky.,Monday, Oct. 13, 2014. (AP)

The CDC in the hot seat on Ebola. Markets reeling. Mid-term fireworks. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Memo To The Vatican: Get Real

October 17, 2014
Eileen McNamara: "By what measure of rational thought is a draft document that asks about homosexuals -- and only asks -- whether the Catholic Church is 'capable of welcoming these people' a cause for celebration?" Pictured: Pope Francis rubs his face during a morning session of a two-week synod on family issues, at the Vatican, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014. Gay rights groups are cautiously cheering a shift in tone from the Catholic Church toward homosexuals. (Alessandra Tarantino/AP)

By what measure of rational thought is a draft document that asks about homosexuals — and only asks — whether the Catholic Church is “capable of welcoming these people” a cause for celebration?

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