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All Things Considered

Obamacare's First Year: How'd It Go?

It has been a year since Obamacare launched with a difficult start. Now, supporters are confident about the program's future. But critics say it's too early to gauge its success.

Michael Dunn Found Guilty In Florida 'Loud Music' Shooting

The case, which ended in a mistrial earlier this year, drew national attention because of its racial overtones. Dunn, a white man, said he shot a black teen because he felt threatened.

Long-Term Birth Control Works Best For Teens, Pediatricians Say

When given their choice of contraceptives for free, almost three-quarters of sexually active teenage girls chose long-acting options like the IUD or hormonal implants, a study finds.

Facebook Apologizes For Name Policy That Affected LGBT Community

The social networking site will not change its requirement for people to use "real" names on their profiles, but it will adjust how alleged violations are reported and enforced.

All Things Considered

Hong Kong Protests Offer A Revelation To Mainland Chinese

Chinese mainlanders visiting Hong Kong have expressed amazement, even jealousy at the polite, civic-spirited and considerate crowds of protesters. But some on the mainland see activists as traitors.

All Things Considered

Proton Center Closure Doesn't Slow New Construction

A proton beam therapy center in Indiana is closing, and insurers are reluctant to cover the treatment for common cancers. But plans for three new proton therapy centers for the D.C. area are still on.

All Things Considered

How A Law From The Civil War Fights Modern-Day Fraud

A Civil War-era law that encourages whistleblowers to turn in their employers has been successful at exposing corporate fraud.

The White House Could Be Made A Fortress, But Should It?

It turns out the Secret Service isn't too good at protecting the White House. Maybe one reason is that we don't want it to be.

Take A New Test Aimed At The World's English-Language Learners

Over 1 billion people around the world are studying English. Now they have a new test to see how they're doing — and if you're curious, you can see how your language skills measure up.

Amid Scandal, Secret Service Director Julia Pierson Resigns

The efficacy of the Secret Service has come under scrutiny lately, after an armed man ran into the White House. Under pressure from lawmakers, the service's chief resigned.

What Makes A City The 'Best'?

October 2, 2014
Duluth, Minnesota's Canal Park Lakewalk, shown here in 2005. (Jacob Norlund / Creative Commons)

What makes a good place to live in America today? We’ll talk with the people who size up our cities and towns.

‘Latino America’: The Politics Of A Population Boom

October 1, 2014
Actress Eva Longoria, center, Henry R. Munoz III, co-founder of the Latino Victory Project, left, and Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, are seated at an event launching The Latino Victory Project, a Latino political action committee, at the National Press Club in Washington, Monday, May 5, 2014. (AP)

Latino America. It is very large and growing very fast. How will it move the country?

What To Expect When You’re No Longer Expecting

October 1, 2014
Jennifer Handt: "I often struggle to find a comfortable balance between adherence to social mores and openness about this big, brutal thing that’s rocked my world." (John Bennett/flickr)

I often struggle to find a comfortable balance between adherence to social mores and openness about this big, brutal thing that’s rocked my world.

Steven Pinker Draws From Linguistics To Answer Questions Of Writing Style

September 30, 2014
Steven Pinker's new book is "The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century." (jeffrey james pacres/Flickr)

Why is there so much bad writing out there, and how do you learn to write well?

Inside America’s Newest Utopia: Tony Hsieh’s Las Vegas

September 30, 2014
An outdoor chess board at the Golden Spike, a rehabilitated hotel in Tony Hsieh's innovation city in downtown Las Vegas. (Vjeran Pavic/Recode)

Re/code’s Nellie Bowles has been reporting from Las Vegas, where Zappos founder Tony Hsieh is attempting to build what Bowles describes as a utopia.

What’s In A Name? The Freighted Title ‘Mrs.’

September 30, 2014
Amy Carleton: "To my mind, Mrs. mainly announces a woman’s relationship status, and with that comes a whole set of preconceived notions that I would rather do without." (mlebemle/Flickr)

To my mind, Mrs. mainly announces a woman’s relationship status, and with that comes a whole set of preconceived notions that I would rather do without.

Methodist Pastor Faces Last Church Trial

September 29, 2014
Former United Methodist pastor Frank Schaefer speaks with reporters after a news conference, Thursday, Dec. 19, 2013, at First United Methodist Church of Germantown in Philadelphia. (Matt Rourke/AP)

Reverend Frank Schaefer, who was defrocked for officiating his son’s same-sex marriage and later reinstated, awaits one more church trial. He writes about the experience in a new memoir.

Heavy Meddle: My Roommate Has Few Friends. Do I Have To Share Mine?

September 29, 2014
Does sharing a home mean sharing a social life?(zubrow/Flickr)

Does sharing a home mean sharing a social life?

New Report: The Changing Face Of Culture In Boston

September 26, 2014

A new report commissioned by the Museum of Fine Arts for the cultural community finds Bostonians more engaged than elsewhere, particularly by Millennials and Gen Xers.

The Red Sox’s Hidden Player: Organist Josh Kantor

September 26, 2014
Josh Kantor, organist for the Boston Red Sox, in Fenway Park. (Amory Sivertson/WBUR)

We talk to Josh Kantor about his 12 years as the organist for the Boston Red Sox.

On Living After Accidentally Killing Someone

September 26, 2014

Poet Gregory Orr reflects on accidentally shooting and killing his brother during a hunting trip decades ago when they were children.

On Stage: High School Band Festival In Luverne, MN

September 26, 2014
This weekend, more than two dozen high school bands will converge on Luverne for the 64th annual Tristate Band Festival. (Tristate Band Festival/Facebook)

Nearly two dozen high school marching bands will converge for the 64th annual TriState Band Festival in Luverne, Minn.

The Hard And Soft Rules Of Apple Cider

September 26, 2014
On Point host Tom Ashbrook raises a toast with a glass of fresh apple cider in the On Point studios. (Jesse Costa / WBUR)

All about hard cider. It’s all over these days. And sweet, fresh apple cider, too. We’ll look at the history and comeback.

Look Up! Small Screens, Big Distractions And The Lost Art Of Knowing Your Place

September 26, 2014
Ethan Gilsdorf: "That inward-turning posture of checking our devices -- call it the “iPhone hunch” -- not only wards off conversation, it prevents us from being aware of the spaces we pass through." (Quinn Dombrowski/flickr)

That inward-turning posture of checking our devices — call it the “iPhone hunch” — not only wards off conversation, it prevents us from being aware of the spaces we pass through.

Michigan Tribe Recovers Its Culture

September 25, 2014
Dancers line up during the Grand Entry at the Hannahville Pow Wow. (Emily Fox/Michigan Radio)

The Potawatomi Tribe in Michigan nearly vanished in the 20th century. But young people are picking up the mantle to revive their culture.

NPR’s Chris Arnold On Garnished Wages

September 24, 2014
Kevin Evans relaxes in his small apartment after arriving home from work. Evans, who lost income and his home in the recession, is now having his wages garnished after falling behind on his credit card payments. (AP)

NPR’s Chris Arnold took part in a remarkable new reporting series tackling the rise of garnished wages as a way to pay off debt. He talked to us today about the series.

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