Life

U.S. Marine In Mexican Jail Is Now Free, Mexican Judge Orders

Andrew Tahmooressi said he made a wrong turn and ended up across the border in Mexico with his legally registered guns, which were illegal in Mexico. He has been in a Mexican jail for seven months.

On Eve Of Promotion, NYPD's Top Uniformed Official Resigns

Philip Banks III was set to become Commissioner William Bratton's deputy. The reasons for his abrupt resignation are not clear.

A 19th Century Novel Explains Quantitative Easing

This week, the Federal Reserve ended the quantitative easing program. Author John Lanchester says Anthony Trollope's 19th century novel The Way We Live Now clarifies the current financial situation.

All Things Considered

Payments Start For N.C. Eugenics Victims, But Many Won't Qualify

North Carolina forcibly sterilized thousands of people between 1929 and 1976. The state has begun compensating victims, but some who were sterilized may never receive restitution from the fund.

All Things Considered

U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power Sees Signs Of Hope In West Africa

After a four-day visit to Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, she reports progress — along with the need for continued support.

All Things Considered

How Liberia Is Starting To Beat Ebola, With Fingers Crossed

There's potentially some good news about Ebola: While cases are still rising in Sierra Leone, the outbreak shows signs of slowing in Liberia. Communities are banding together to get Ebola out.

Former Band Member Found Guilty In FAMU Hazing Case

A Florida jury found Dante Martin guilty of manslaughter for his role in the fatal hazing of drum major Robert Champion.

A Field Of Medicine That Wants To Know Where You Live

Where do you live? Health specialists think that simple question could make a difference in how doctors prevent and treat diseases for individuals. That's expanding its storied role in public health.

Why Is North Korea Freaked Out About The Threat Of Ebola?

Fear of the virus has prompted Pyongyang to ban tourism and quarantine all foreigners. It's a curious stance since the Hermit Kingdom has plenty of other, more pressing health woes.

After Mass Protests, Hungary Gives Up On Internet Tax

The government had proposed taxing Internet usage, but opponents claimed it the government was trying to impose a digital iron curtain on Hungary.

They Ain't No Hollaback Girls: The Realities Of Street Harassment

November 3, 2014
A still from the Rob Bliss Creative street harassment video. (Rob Bliss Creative)

An internet video of a woman showered in catcalls on the street goes viral. We’ll look at women and men in public space. The catcall culture.

Homelessness Up 40 Percent In Mass. Since 2007

October 31, 2014
During the city's 2013 homeless census, Elisabeth Jackson, executive director of Bridge Over Troubled Waters, asks a homeless person sleeping in a doorway on Bromfield Street if he needs any assistance. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

The report, based on a point-in-time census, found homelessness in Massachusetts rose 40.4 percent since 2007, even as homelessness nationwide decreased 11 percent.

Lenox Nurse Ebola-Free After 21 Days Following Doctors Without Borders Protocol

October 31, 2014
Nurse Deborah Wilson at WBUR's studios. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

Deborah Wilson, a nurse who treated Ebola patients in Liberia , talks about her experience returning to everyday life in Lenox, Massachusetts, and the panic she has encountered while home.

I Am A Teenage Witch

October 31, 2014
Youth Radio’s Akemi Weaver is a self-described "teen witch." (Screenshot from Youth Radio)

For some people, being a witch isn’t just for Halloween. From Youth Radio, Akemi Weaver sent us this report to explain why.

Chevy Embraces ‘Technology And Stuff’ Gaffe

October 31, 2014
Screenshot from video with Chevy exec saying "technology and stuff"

Rikk Wilde had a difficult time presenting a brand new truck to baseball’s MVP, saying the truck has leading “technology and stuff.”

Hanna Rosin On ‘The Problem With That Catcalling Video’

October 31, 2014
Screenshot from video showing street harassment in New York City. (Screenshot from YouTube)

Rosin says many of the white catcallers were edited out of the video, creating the impression it’s a problem mostly with black and Latino men.

Why Tim Cook’s Coming Out Matters

October 31, 2014
Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks following an introduction of the new iPhone 5 in San Francisco, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (Eric Risberg/AP)

The Apple CEO’s announcement that he’s “proud to be gay” makes him the first CEO of a Fortune 500 company to publicly come out.

For Tom Menino, Being Mayor Of Boston Was A Labor Of Love

October 31, 2014
Tiziana Dearing: "Mayor Menino loved Boston. Everyone says it. But to know him, to work with him, was to discover layers upon layers of his love for the job, the city and its people." Pictured: The late Mayor of Boston, Tom Menino, greeting a youth summer worker on July 13, 1993.

Mayor Menino loved Boston. Everyone says it. But to know him, to work with him, was to discover layers upon layers of his love for the job, the city and its people.

Remembering Mayor Tom Menino, And The Maple Tree He Didn’t Forget

October 31, 2014
Renee Loth: "Whether we saw each other weekly or after an absence of six months, nearly his first words of greeting were invariably about the tree. How’s that tree doin’? Tree good? How’s the tree? Pictured: Mayor Tom Menino and the author, sharing a laugh about her maple tree, May 22, 2012. (Boston Society of Architects/flickr)

Whether we saw each other weekly or after an absence of six months, nearly his first words of greeting were invariably about the tree. How’s that tree doin’? Tree good? How’s the tree?

Eerie Reads For Halloween

October 30, 2014
If you’re a child of the '80s or '90s, you might remember the tales from "Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark." (gschmd/Flickr)

Petra Mayer of NPR Books recommends a new scary story collection, as well as the ’80s classic, “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark.”

Soylent Isn't People; But Is It The End Of Food?

October 30, 2014
Soylent is a new meal-replacement substance meant to offer a complete nutritional alternative to traditional food. (Courtesy Soylent)

Soylent is a grey smoothie the consistency of pancake batter that claims it can replace all your food. On a crowded planet, is this the future of food? Plus: what does the Antares rocket crash mean for private space travel?

Why Homeownership Isn't Catching Up With The Rest Of The Economy

October 30, 2014
Realtor Helen Hertz stands in front of one of her listings in Cleveland Heights, Ohio Friday, Oct. 24, 2014. Hertz, a real estate agent for more than three decades, has seen firsthand what has happened to the market in the wake of the recession and foreclosure crisis. (AP)

Home ownership rates are at a 20-year low. Millennials and more aren’t buying. We’ll look at what American’s think now about owning a home.

The Age Of Innocence: When I Didn’t Know What I Didn’t Know About Sex

October 30, 2014
Barbara Beckwith: "Necking in high school gave me clues, like that boys break into a sweat and squirm mightily after a few minutes of kissing." (Vlasta Juricek/flickr)

Necking in high school gave me clues, like that boys break into a sweat and squirm mightily after a few minutes of kissing.

Generation Stuck? Millennial Argues Peers Need To Grow Up

October 29, 2014
1028_millennial1

According to one study, today’s 25-year-olds are 50 percent more likely to receive financial help from mom and dad than a generation ago.

A Blessing Of Stuffed Animals

October 29, 2014
Pictured are Rev. Dwight Lee Wolter (left) and Bill Paauwe. (Titus Kana)

The Congregational Church of Patchogue in Long Island, N.Y. held a blessing for stuffed animals to celebrate the Feast of St. Francis of Assisi.

Hidden Camera Video Shows Street Harassment Of Women In NYC

October 29, 2014
Screenshot from video showing street harassment in New York City. (Screenshot from YouTube)

What do you think of the video? Does it surprise you? Does it hit home for you? Let us know in the comments.

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