Nation
All Things Considered

Northwest Oil Terminal Plan Would Mean Jobs — And More Oil Trains

Oil companies hope to build the nation's largest oil-by-rail terminal on the Columbia River in Washington. Proponents say it will bring economic growth, but others fear it could mean fiery accidents.

All Things Considered

Clinton's Use Of Personal Email Could Hamper Archiving Efforts

NPR's Melissa Block talks to Jason R. Baron, former director of litigation at the National Archives, about federal laws governing email.

All Things Considered

Boston Marathon Bombing Trial Opens With Admission Of Guilt

Opening statements began Wednesday in the trial of alleged Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Both the defense and prosecution agree Tsarnaev is guilty, but they differ on why he did it.

All Things Considered

In LA, Clearing A Backlog Of Aging Instruments

The district has made progress, but many students are stuck with broken strings, squeaky horns and out-of-tune pianos.

All Things Considered

Ferguson Residents Not Surprised By DOJ Report Findings

The U.S. Department of Justice's report found the Ferguson, Mo., Police Department routinely practices "unconstitutional policing."

All Things Considered

DOJ Report Reveals Pattern Of Racial Discrimination By Ferguson Police

The Justice Department says it has formally closed its investigation into the death of Michael Brown without bringing any federal charges against the police officer who killed him. But the department did find evidence of both indirect and direct discrimination by the Ferguson Police Department and courts.

All Things Considered

A Ruling Against Obamacare Would Have Broad Implications

If the Supreme Court strikes down subsidies, millions of people could no longer afford health insurance. And premiums for others would rise dramatically, as healthier people leave the marketplace.

Ferguson Documents: Justice Investigation Backs Former Officer Wilson

The grand jury documents left doubt, but federal investigators say they found "no credible evidence to disprove [Officer Darren] Wilson's perception that Brown posed a threat."

Programs Help Students Cut Back On Booze, But Not For Long

Most colleges have some sort of alcohol education program. One-time interventions do cut drinking, but only short term. They tend to work better for women, with no benefit for men in frats.

Few Clues On Health Law's Future Emerge In Supreme Court Arguments

Will the Supreme Court strike down tax credits that help moderate-income Americans afford coverage in the three dozen states where the marketplace is being run by the federal government?

Racial Bias In Ferguson, And Beyond

March 5, 2015
A car passes a memorial for Michael Brown, who was shot and killed by Ferguson, Mo., Police Officer Darren Wilson last summer, Tuesday, March 3, 2015, in Ferguson. A Justice Department investigation found sweeping patterns of racial bias within the Ferguson police department, with officers routinely discriminating against blacks by using excessive force, issuing petty citations and making baseless traffic stops, according to law enforcement officials familiar with the report.  (AP)

The big Justice Department report finds a pattern of racial bias in the Ferguson Police Department. Now what? We’re back in Ferguson – and beyond — for answers.

Greater Than A Championship: Ending The Culture Of Silence In Sexual Assault Cases

March 4, 2015
Duke head coach Mike Krzyzewski dismissed junior guard Rasheed Sulaimon. Two female students alleged Sulaimon had sexually assaulted them. (Lance King/Getty Images)

Duke University’s men’s basketball team is readying for the annual NCAA Championship in march. but Only A Game’s Bill Littlefield says there are greater aspirations the team, and Coach K, should aspire to in the wake of sexual assault allegations against a former player.

Smarter Robots In The Works

March 4, 2015
CoBot, short for Collaborative Robot, is designed to be an office helper. The bots, made by a team at Carnegie Mellon University led by professor Manuela Veloso, can navigate around a building on their own. They are also smart enough to know when to ask humans for help, such as to press buttons and open doors. (cs.cmu.edu)

Prachi Patel of IEEE Spectrum reports on a new bot that will work better in human environments.

Target To Lay Off Thousands, Restructure

March 4, 2015
Target Corp. said information from some 40 million Target shoppers' credit and debit cards was stolen in the three weeks after Thanksgiving. (Jay Reed/Flickr)

The retail giant says most of the layoffs will be at its headquarters, as part of a restructuring plan that aims to save $2 billion over two years.

Tension Grows Between U.S. And Venezuela

March 4, 2015
Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro delivers a speech during a ceremony commemorating the 26th anniversary of El Caracazo -- a deadly popular revolt -- in Caracas on February 28, 2015. Maduro announced he was implementing a mandatory visa system for all U.S. citizens visiting the country, as a way to 'control' U.S. interference. (Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)

Venezuela has announced that Americans will now have to pay for travel visas to enter the country.

Boehner Not The First House Speaker To Face Rebellion

March 4, 2015
U.S. Speaker of the House John Boehner speaks during a press conference on Capitol Hill on February 26, 2015 in Washington, D.C. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

Republicans have a history of rebellion against their speaker; Democrats not so much. We dig into the history with Joshua Spivak.

As An Activist, How Do You Cover Immigration As A Journalist?

March 4, 2015
'Documented' director Jose Antonio Vargas poses following a panel discussion at the 17th Annual Savannah Film Festival on October 31, 2014 in Savannah, Georgia. (Cindy Ord/Getty Images for SCAD)

NPR’s David Folkenflik discusses #EmergingUS and how news organizations have walked the line between activism and journalism.

‘With Malice Toward None': Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address

March 4, 2015
Abraham Lincoln is pictured in November 1863. (Wikimedia Commons)

It was on this day 150 years ago that President Abraham Lincoln delivered his last and perhaps most famous speech.

FDA Says ‘Low-T’ Drugs May Lead To Heart Disease And Stroke

March 4, 2015
Tubes of Testim testosterone gel are seen at the Auxilium Pharmaceuticals Inc. packing facility in Norristown, Pa., Friday May 16, 2003. (Jacqueline Larma/AP)

The Food and Drug Administration has issued new warnings against products claiming to treat low testosterone due to aging.

Social Security: How To Get What’s Yours

March 4, 2015
Trays of social security checks are pictured at the U.S. Treasury printing facility on July 18, 2011 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (William Thomas Cain/Getty Images)

How and when you tap into Social Security benefits can dramatically alter how much money you get.

Ferguson Reacts To Scathing Justice Department Report

March 4, 2015
A boy walks past a memorial for Michael Brown, who was shot and killed by Ferguson, Mo., Police Officer Darren Wilson last summer, Tuesday, March 3, 2015, in Ferguson. A Justice Department investigation found sweeping patterns of racial bias within the Ferguson police department, with officers routinely discriminating against blacks by using excessive force, issuing petty citations and making baseless traffic stops, according to law enforcement officials familiar with the report. (Charles Rex Arbogast/AP)

The report found that the Ferguson police department is systematically violating the rights of its black citizens.

All Marriage On Hold In At Least 1 Alabama County

March 4, 2015
Shanté Wolfe, left, and Tori Sisson, right, wait for their marriage license to be processed before becoming the first couple to file their marriage license in Montgomery, Ala., Feb. 9, 2015. The Alabama Supreme Court on Tuesday, March 3, 2015 ordered the state’s probate judges to stop issuing marriage licenses to gay couples, saying previous rulings that gay-marriage bans violate the U.S. Constitution do not preclude them from following state law, which defines marriage as between a man and a woman. (Brynn Anderson/AP)

Mobile County’s probate court says it’s not issuing any marriage licenses while it reviews the latest decision on same-sex marriage.

Big Potential For Tiny Houses

March 4, 2015
This photo taken July 31, 2012 shows a "tiny" house April Anson built in Portland, Ore. For the past couple of months, 33-year-old Anson and her friends have been planning, measuring, sawing and hammering their way toward completion of what might look like a child’s playhouse. (AP)

Tiny houses, micro-apartments. They’re hot. Americans are downsizing.

Trouble At Clinton, Inc.

March 4, 2015
Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a keynote address at the Watermark Silicon Valley Conference for Women, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Santa Clara, Calif.  (AP)

Hillary Clinton’s week of bad headlines: about her emails and foreign money going to the Clinton Foundation. We’ll dig in.

Federal Probe Finds Racial Bias In Ferguson Police, Officials Say

March 3, 2015
In this Monday Nov. 24, 2014 file photo, people walk away from a storage facility on fire after the grand jury decision was announced in Ferguson. (Jeff Roberson/AP)

The officials say the report will allege direct evidence of racial bias among police officers and court workers and detail a criminal justice system that prioritizes generating revenue over public safety.

Speeding Up The Game Of Baseball

March 3, 2015
Juan Perez #2, Gregor Blanco #7 and Hunter Pence #8 of the San Francisco Giants celebrate after defeating the Washington Nationals on October 4, 2014. The game was the longest of the 2014 season, ending in the 18 innings. (Patrick Smith/Getty Images)

After last season’s average Major League Baseball game lasted a record 3 hours and 2 minutes, the push is on to speed things up.

Most Popular