Policy

Eric Frein, Suspected Of Killing Pennsylvania Trooper, In Custody

Police say Frein opened fire on two state troopers more than a month ago, and they've been searching for him since. The Pike County district attorney says he intends to seek the death penalty.

All Things Considered

The Devastating History Of Midterm Elections

Over the past century, midterm elections have been pretty rough on the party that holds the White House.

Red Cross Responds To NPR/ProPublica Report On Storm Response Inefficiencies

An NPR investigation revealed how the emergency organization funneled its resources away from storm victims to create an "illusion of mass care." The Red Cross tells PBS NewsHour that's not true.

Awful Moments In Quarantine History: Remember Typhoid Mary?

Quarantines have been imposed on the sick and contagious for thousands of years. We look at the use — and abuse — of this strategy to stop the spread of disease.

Maker Of 'Body Cams' Used By Police Reports Spike In Sales

What's interesting is the spike started well before the August shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri.

All Things Considered

Ebola Researchers Banned From Medical Meeting In New Orleans

One of the top scientific conferences on tropical diseases will take place without the people who have the most recent and direct experience with Ebola in West Africa.

Sweden Recognizes Palestine, Drawing Sharp Israeli Criticism

Israel's foreign minister says diplomacy is "more complicated than ... furniture from Ikea." His Swedish counterpart responds that diplomacy, like Ikea furniture, needs "a partner ... [and] a manual."

So For Halloween You're Dressing Up As ... A Sexy Ebola Nurse?

Why are infectious disease costumes even a thing? It's actually a relatively new development in Halloween history, but there are precedents. See: Plague Doctor mask, Venice.

All Things Considered

Nurse Kaci Hickox Takes A Bike Ride, Defying Maine's Quarantine

Hickox, who returned to the U.S. after treating Ebola patients in West Africa, tested negative for Ebola upon her return, and she has no symptoms — so she says she poses no threat to the public.

All Things Considered

Obamas Head To Connecticut As Tight Governor's Race Nears Close

Incumbent Dannel Malloy and Republican rival Tom Foley are neck and neck; the race is so close that both the president and first lady will visit the state in the next few days. NPR's Melissa Block talks to Hartford Courant political reporter Daniela Altimari about the race.

As U. S. Hospitals Prepare Ebola Response, Nurses Must Have A Seat At The Table

October 30, 2014
Angela Nannini: "In times of crisis, nurses are often excluded from decision-making conversations at every level of health care organizations, from patient care decisions to hospital policy and protocols." Pictured: Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas staff line the drive that exits the emergency room as they wait for an ambulance carrying Nina Pham to depart, Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014, in Dallas. Pham, a nurse at the hospital, was diagnosed with the Ebola virus after caring for Thomas Eric Duncan, who died of the same virus. Amber Vinson, another nurse diagnosed, was taken to a similar location in Atlanta. Both nurses have since been declared Ebola free and have been released from care. (Tony Gutierrez/AP)

In times of crisis, nurses are often excluded from decision-making conversations at every level of health care organizations, from patient care decisions to hospital policy and protocols.

Walsh: Boston Preparing For Climate Change

October 29, 2014

Mayor Marty Walsh says Boston has made significant strides in preparing for major natural disasters, rising sea levels and other impacts to the ever-changing climate on the two-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy.

What Makes Somerville So Trendy, And Where’s The Next Somerville?

October 29, 2014
Bartender Melinda Maddox makes a cocktail at Backbar restaurant and bar in Somerville, Mass. Over the past several years, Somerville’s eclectic Union Square neighborhood has become a drinking and dining destination. (Steven Senne/AP)

Once upon a time it was known as “Slumerville,” but now Somerville is synonymous with hip and trendy.

As Election Nears, Republicans Plan For Senate Takeover

October 29, 2014
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) (2nd-R) speaks to reporters while flanked by (L-R), Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO), Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY) Sen. John Thune (R-SD) and Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) after attending the weekly Republican policy luncheon at the U.S. Capitol on February 4, 2014 in Washington, DC. (Mark Wilson/AFP/Getty Images)

Republicans stand a good chance of winning control of the Senate. Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso discusses the party’s policy agenda.

Mass. Amps Up Security In Wake Of General Terror Threats

October 29, 2014

Massachusetts public safety agencies are beefing up security at public buildings and locations around the state as a response to recent violence both domestic and abroad, including the attack last week at Canada’s capitol.

How Far Have We Come Since The Financial Crisis?

October 29, 2014
Michael Lewis, a financial journalist and author, is pictured at George Washington University on April 4, 2014 in Washington, D.C. (T.J. Kirkpatrick/Getty Images)

Or are we already going backwards? We ask Michael Lewis, author of books including “Flash Boys” and “Liar’s Poker.”

Fed Keeps Rate At Record Low, Ends Bond Buying

October 29, 2014
Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen is pictured testifying before the House Financial Services Committee on July 16, 2014. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

As expected, the Federal Reserve is ending a bond purchase program that was intended to keep long-term rates low.

State Predicts Shortage Of College Grads, Calls For More Funding

October 28, 2014

The report predicts that by 2025 public campuses will graduate roughly 55,000 to 65,000 fewer students than employers will need.

Massachusetts Gas Tax Ballot Question Explained

October 28, 2014
Traffic on Interstate 91 south is detoured off the highway at Greenfield, Mass., Monday, Aug. 29, 2011. (AP)

A “no” vote keeps the tax the gas way it is, while a “yes” vote would decouple the tax from inflation adjustments over time.

A Brief History Of Medical Quarantine

October 28, 2014
Kaci Hickox (R) speaks with civil rights attorney Norman Siegel from within her mandatory quarantine tent in Newark, NJ. (Steven Hyman)

The history of quarantines, from the Spanish Flu to polio to Ebola and the challenge of fighting an epidemic and fear of the epidemic.

5 Key Policy Differences Between Baker And Coakley

October 28, 2014
Democrat Martha Coakley and Republican Charlie Baker stand together at a Greater Boston Interfaith Organization candidates forum at Fourth Presbyterian Church in Boston on Sunday. (Michael Dwyer/AP)

Here’s how the leading gubernatorial candidates have set themselves apart on early education, higher ed, earned sick time, welfare reform and climate change.

Why Are Electricity Prices Expected To Skyrocket In New England This Winter?

October 27, 2014
Peggy Udden, of Norwood, Mass., shovels her driveway in Norwood, Feb. 5, 2014. (Steven Senne/AP)

New England families planning their heating budget for the coming winter might be in for a cold shock.

With Election Day Looming, Gubernatorial Candidates Make Closing Arguments

October 27, 2014
Massachusetts gubernatorial candidates Democrat Martha Coakley, left, and Republican Charlie Baker (Barry Chin, The Boston Globe, Pool/AP)

For the latest on the governor’s race, we talk with WBUR’s Asma Khalid, Republican strategist Jeff Stinson and former Democratic state treasurer Shannon O’Brien.

Casinos: A Losing Bet For Massachusetts

October 27, 2014
Donald M. Berwick: "We have a chance in our state to invest in a declining industry that will harm our economy, reduce property values, kill more jobs than it adds, lower incomes, injure public safety, reduce net government revenues, increase a major mental health burden and selectively harm the poor. Or, we can stop it." (Mait Jüriado/flickr)

We have a chance in our state to invest in a declining industry that will harm our economy, reduce property values, kill more jobs than it adds, lower incomes, injure public safety, reduce net government revenues, increase a major mental health burden and selectively harm the poor. Or, we can stop it.

Mass. ‘Blue Laws’ Change To Allow Liquor Stores To Sell Alcohol 2 Hours Earlier On Sundays

October 26, 2014
In this file photo, a pedestrian walks past Paul Revere Beverage in Somerville, Mass. on Sunday Jan. 4, 2004, the day the 'blue laws' changed to allow liquor stores in the state to stay open Sundays to sell alcoholic beverages. This Sunday, stores can open two hours earlier than the 2004 change allowed. (Lisa Poole/AP)

Starting Sunday, Massachusetts’ so-called “blue laws” will now allow liquor stores in the state to open at 10 a.m. — instead of noon — on Sundays to sell alcohol without needing to get any special permission from local authorities.

State House Roundup: Good Guy, Charlie

October 24, 2014

A bold-faced name. A narrative-changing poll. Two head-to-head debates sounding the gun on the final sprint for redemption.

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