Science
All Things Considered

In Tom Hanks' iPad App, Typewriters Make Triumphant Return (Ding!)

For iPad users who are nostalgic for the clickety-clack of keystrokes and "ding!" of the carriage return, Hanks has created Hanx Writer, an app that simulates using a typewriter.

Fresh Air

Want To Dine Out? You May Need To Buy Tickets — Or Bid On A Table

Some of the nation's restaurants are using technology to make diners commit before their night out. It's convenient for the restaurant and customer — and it may pry people away from old habits.

Celebrity Photo Leak Puts Spotlight On The Cloud, And Security

Publication of private photos of Jennifer Lawrence and other celebrities raises new questions about storing personal data online. Apple says its systems weren't breached.

More Evidence That ADHD Drugs Don't Curb Ultimate Height

Some earlier research hinted that Ritalin and Adderall can hamper a child's growth. But a study of adults who took the drugs as kids now suggests any such effect is only temporary.

Morning Edition

Our Use Of Little Words Can, Uh, Reveal Hidden Interests

When we talk, we focus on the "content" words — the ones that convey information. But the tiny words that tie our sentences together have a lot to say about power and relationships.

All Things Considered

X Prize Competition Could Make 'Tricorder' A Reality

Many Star Trek gadgets have made the journey from science fiction to real life. Arun Rath talks to Grant Campany about the X Prize Foundation's competition to bring the medical tricorder to life.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Study Finds Nothing Special About Breakfast

Maybe we don't need to eat our Wheaties. Linda Wertheimer talks to Emily Dhurandhar, lead author of a study that finds breakfast may not be the most important meal of the day.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Citizen Scientists On A Mission To Find Frogs

Summer is high season for "frogging." The North American Amphibian Monitoring Project has hundreds of volunteers crisscrossing the country to get a better handle on the fate of the nation's frogs.

Weekend Edition Sunday

The Salmon Cannon: Easier Than Shooting Fish Out Of A Barrel

Alarmed by the rapid decline of wild salmon populations, a company has invented a novel way to help migratory fish over blocked rivers. It uses air pressure to fire them out of a cannon.

Tech Week: Uber's Tricks, JPMorgan Hacked & A Desk Microwave

Also in this week's roundup, Amazon's $1 billion purchase surprises some tech watchers. Yet we're most excited about finding a way to avoid physical exertion at lunch.

The Girl With Three Biological Parents

September 2, 2014
Alana Saarinen is one of only 30 to 50 people in the world who have DNA from three different people. (Screenshot via BBC)

Alana Saarinen is one of only 30 to 50 people in the world who have DNA from three different people.

Quantum Computing: The Holy Grail Of The Information Age

September 1, 2014
A close-up of a microchip under a microscope. (Jasper Nance/Flickr)

Some of the biggest technology companies are working to build a computer powerful enough to solve complex mathematical riddles.

Repelling Mosquitoes With A Natural Sticky Patch

August 29, 2014
A demonstration of the Kite Patch is shown in this image from ieCrowd. (Courtesy of ieCrowd)

The Kite Patch releases odors that block the bug’s carbon dioxide receptors, sending them in another direction.

‘Enormous’ Growth Of Ocean Garbage Patch

August 28, 2014
Oceanographer Charles J. Moore found this garbage patch in 1997, but he says he's "shocked" by the amount of growth in the past 15 years. (Algalita Marine Research and Education)

The oceanographer who discovered the floating island of trash in 1997 says he’s shocked by how much it’s grown.

The State Of America's Wine Industry

August 28, 2014
Some of the hundreds of earthquake damaged wine barrels cover and toppled a pair of forklifts at the Kieu Hoang Winery, Monday, Aug. 25, 2014, in Napa, Calif. A powerful earthquake that struck the heart of California's wine country caught many people sound asleep, sending dressers, mirrors and pictures crashing down around them and toppling wine bottles in vineyards around the region. (AP)

Drought in California, earthquake in Napa. We look at broken bottles and the health of the American wine industry.

Predicting When Turtles Will Hatch Could Help Outer Banks Economy

August 25, 2014
When a turtle nest is found, park rangers excavate the nest, inventory the eggs and mark out the nests with a 30-foot square enclosure. (National Park Service)

Park rangers at Cape Hatteras National Seashore hope electronic sensors will allow them to predict exactly when turtle eggs will hatch.

Week In The News: Ferguson Simmers, An ISIS Beheading, West Africa's Ebola Crisis

August 22, 2014
Attorney General Eric Holder talks with Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri State Highway Patrol at Drake's Place Restaurant, Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014, in Florrissant, Mo. (AP)

The National Guard and Eric Holder in Ferguson. ISIS beheads an American journalist. Texas Governor Rick Perry gets a mug shot. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Marlborough Company’s ‘Exoskeleton’ Lets Some Paraplegics Walk Again

August 20, 2014
Gene Laureano, a 51-year-old Army veteran from the Bronx, uses the ReWalk exoskeleton. (WBUR/Sacha Pfeiffer)

Massachusetts-based ReWalk Robotics makes a motorized exoskeleton that allows some paraplegics to walk again.

Why You Should Worry About The Butterflies

August 20, 2014
In this Oct. 21, 2013 file photo, a monarch butterfly lands on a confetti lantana plant in San Antonio. A half-century ago Monarch butterflies, tired, hungry and bursting to lay eggs, found plenty of nourishment flying across Texas. Native white-flowering balls of antelope milkweed covered grasslands, growing alongside nectar-filled wildflowers. But now, these orange-and-black winged butterflies find mostly buildings, manicured lawns and toxic, pesticide-filled plants. (AP)

This year’s monarch butterfly migration is the smallest ever recorded. We’ll ask why. It’s a big story. Plus: how climate change is creating new hybridized species.

MIT’s David Wilson On His Carbon Tax Proposal

August 19, 2014
An advocacy group in Massachusetts is proposing a revenue-neutral carbon tax that could potentially increase taxes on gas, but at the same time would reduce income and sales taxes. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

MIT Professor Emeritus David Wilson is credited with coming up with one of the earliest prototypes for a carbon tax.

Are We Losing Touch In The Doctor-Patient Relationship?

August 18, 2014
More studies are calling into question the measurable value of the physical examination. Is there still a place for physical touch in the doctor-patient relationship?(Children's Bureau of the Department of Health and Human Services/ Flickr)

A physician laments the decline of the physical exam and asks whether there’s still a place for touch in the digital age.

As Pot Laws Relax, Restrictions On Research Still Tight

August 18, 2014
A worker cultivates a special strain of medical marijuana known as Charlotte's Web inside a greenhouse, in a remote spot in the mountains west of Colorado Springs, Colo., Feb. 7, 2014. (Brennan Linsley/AP)

The firing of a University of Arizona doctor highlights the complexity and politics of marijuana research.

What Autopsies Can And Can’t Reveal

August 18, 2014
Michael Brown is pictured in this Facebook photo dated January 5, 2013. (Big'mike Jr Brown/Facebook)

As the results of a private autopsy of Michael Brown are made public, a forensic pathologist discusses what an autopsy can – and can’t – determine about a crime scene.

West Africa's Ebola Epidemic Spreads

August 18, 2014
In this photo taken on Tuesday, Aug 12, 2014, a healthcare worker, right, wears protective gear against the Ebola virus before he enters the Ebola isolation ward at Kenema Government Hospital, in Kenema, the Eastern Province around 300km, (186 miles), from the capital city of Freetown in Sierra Leone. (AP)

Ebola: more than a thousand dead now. An unprecedented spread. We’ll look at what it will take to stop it.

NASA Chief On Past And Future Of U.S. Space Program

August 14, 2014
A Perseid meteor streaks through the Earth's atmosphere, as seen and photographed by astronaut Ron Garan while aboard the International Space Station on August 13, 2011. (NASA)

Charles Bolden, who is also a former astronaut, joins us for a wide-ranging conversation.

New Studies: Low-Salt Diet May Be Harmful

August 14, 2014
Salt shaker (Wen Zhang/Flickr)

Three new studies challenge the low salt intake levels recommended by groups like the American Heart Association.

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