Rundown 11/3

President Obama Faces New Political Reality

President Barack Obama addresses reporters during a news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington. (AP)
President Barack Obama addresses reporters during a news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington. (AP)

President Obama told reporters Wednesday that voters frustrated by the pace of economic recovery brought about a Republican takeover of the House and gains in the Senate.  He said "as president I take responsibility" for failing to restore jobs faster. The next likely Speaker of the House, Republican John Boehner, also spoke Wednesday, promising to reduce the size of government, create jobs and rollback healthcare reform.

We speak to Gail Chaddock of the Christian Science Monitor and Diana Reimer, the national coordinator for the Tea Party Patriots.

Alaska Senate Race Is Too Close To Call

At center, United States Senator Lisa Murkowski (R) Alaska walks to Anchorage, Alaska's election central with sons Nick, left and Matt. (AP)
At center, United States Senator Lisa Murkowski (R) Alaska walks to Anchorage, Alaska's election central with sons Nick, left and Matt. (AP)

It will be a long wait, but early returns suggest Sen. Lisa Murkowski is ahead in the U.S. Senate race in Alaska. She launched a write-in campaign after losing in the Republican primary to Joe Miller, who had support from both Sarah Palin and the Tea Party. Michael Carey, former editorial page editor of the Anchorage Daily News and host of the public broadcasting show Anchorage Edition joins us to discuss that and Sarah Palin's next political move.

From Legalizing Pot To Tax Measures, How Did Ballot Questions Fare?

Californians rejected plans to legalize marijuana and also killed a measure that would have suspended the state's clean air laws. Massachusetts voters supported a measure eliminating a tax on alcohol, but rejected a measure cutting the sales tax. Voters in Oklahoma approved an amendment that prohibits courts from relying on Sharia or international law in deciding cases. We speak to Jennie Drage Bowser of the National Conference of State Legislators.

What Will The History Books Say About The 2010 Midterms?

In this image released by the White House, President Barack Obama makes an election night phone call to Rep. John Boehner, R-Ohio, who will most likely be the next House Speaker, from the Treaty Room in the White House. (AP)
In this image released by the White House, President Barack Obama makes an election night phone call to Rep. John Boehner, R-Ohio, who will most likely be the next House Speaker, from the Treaty Room in the White House. (AP)

What is it about presidents and midterms? Bill Clinton lost both houses of Congress in 1994. The same thing happened to George W. Bush in 2006. Yesterday, a Republican wave swept over President Barack Obama, giving the GOP control of the House and slicing into the Democrat's advantage in the Senate. Julian Zelizer, professor of history and public affairs at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School, joins us to put the 2010 mid-terms into historical perspective. His latest book, "Jimmy Carter," is part of "The American Presidents Series."

Music From The Show

  • Peter Dixon, "Nagog Woods"
  • Freddie Hubbard, "Little Sunflower"
  • Paul Simon, "50 Ways To Leave Your Lover"
  • Talking Heads, "This Must Be the Place"
  • Moby, "Inside"
  • Massive Attack, "Future Proof"

This program aired on November 3, 2010. The audio for this program is not available.

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