Closing Guantanamo Bay, Easier Said Than Done07:06
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Abu Zubaydah, one of the many terrorism suspects held without charges in the Guantanamo Bay detention center.  (AP/U.S. Central Command, File)
Abu Zubaydah, one of the many terrorism suspects held without charges in the Guantanamo Bay detention center. (AP/U.S. Central Command, File)

Two years after President Obama vowed to close the Guantanamo Bay detention camp, 174 terrorism suspects remain there, held without charges or trials.

On Friday President Obama signed a Pentagon spending bill from the last Congress that limits his ability to move Guantanamo detainees to the U.S. for trial, though he vowed to work with Congress to repeal the restrictions.

And he's soon expected to issue a controversial executive order spelling out rules that would allow for the continued indefinite detention of the most dangerous suspects at Guantanamo.

We speak with Dafna Linzer, who writes about the political and legal issues concerning the detention center for ProPublica, the independent, investigative journalism website.

We also speak to Brent Mickum, who has represented several Guantanamo detainees, including Abu Zubaydah.  Zubaydah was captured in 2002 in a gunfight in Pakistan.  The Bush Administration called him the third or fourth ranked man in al-Qaida. He was interrogated by FBI agents immediately after his capture and a 2005 Justice Department memo says that the CIA used waterboarding on Zubaydah more than a hundred times.

This segment aired on January 11, 2011.

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