Midwest Drought Leaves Boaters High And Dry05:08
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A pontoon is anchored on a mud flat as the owner could not reach their dock at Morse Reservoir in Noblesville, Ind. The reservoir is down nearly 6 feet from normal levels and being lowered 1 foot every five days to provide water for Indianapolis. (AP)
A pontoon is anchored on a mud flat as the owner could not reach their dock at Morse Reservoir in Noblesville, Ind. The reservoir is down nearly 6 feet from normal levels and being lowered 1 foot every five days to provide water for Indianapolis. (AP)

It's being called the country's worst drought in 50 years, covering more area even than the famous 1936 drought.

In addition to farming and shipping, the lack of water is taking a huge toll on tourism and recreation.

In Illinois, 70 percent of the state is now facing "exceptional" drought conditions, a single category away from the "extreme," or most severe designation.

Vermillion River Rafting owners Bob and Ruth Herbst in Oglesby, Illinois had their shortest season in 17 years of operation. They ran this summer's trips on the Vermillion River for only two-and-a-half weeks, and lost nearly $100,000 in lost business.

Guest:

  • Bob Herbst, co-owner of Vermillion River Rafting

This segment aired on August 14, 2012.

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