In China, Another Food Scandal Makes Headlines04:23
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BBC correspondent Celia Hatton holds up the results of a home food test, indicating that the milk is contaminated. (BBC video screenshot)
BBC correspondent Celia Hatton holds up the results of a home food test, indicating that the milk is contaminated. (BBC video screenshot)

In China, it seems to be "another week, another food scandal." Chinese citizens are worn down with news of contaminated food — including toxic milk powder, poisonous rice and fake food.

Unscrupulous restaurants and food stalls have been caught selling everything from fake eggs made of gelatine, to the latest scandal — duck meat passed off as lamb.

So how are the citizens reacting? They're coming up with their own solutions to deal with the crisis, as the BBC's Celia Hatton reports from Beijing.

BBC Video: Why are Chinese people using home food safety tests?

Reporter

  • Celia Hatton, BBC news correspondent based in Beijing. She tweets @celiahatton.

This segment aired on July 17, 2013.

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