One Mexican-American Family, Three Legal Statuses04:25
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Cynthia Alba, 19, is working legally in the United States for the first time after receiving deferred action last year. She said the possibility that immigration reform will stall once again, and her deferred action work permit will expire, terrifies her. (Heath Haussamen/Fronteras Desk)
Cynthia Alba, 19, is working legally in the United States for the first time after receiving deferred action last year. She said the possibility that immigration reform will stall once again, and her deferred action work permit will expire, terrifies her. (Heath Haussamen/Fronteras Desk)

Among the millions of immigrant families living in the United States, many have mixed legal status.

One family member may be here illegally, another might have a temporary permit and another may be a U.S. citizen. This creates uncomfortable disparities within families.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Mónica Ortiz Uribe of Fronteras Desk -- in collaboration with the online news organization New Mexico In Depth -- has the story of one such family.

Cynthia Alba, 19, entered the country illegally when she was a toddler and now qualifies for President Obama's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. Her mother remains undocumented and her sister is a U.S. citizen.

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This segment aired on August 27, 2013.

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