Violence Transformed JFK’s Civil Rights Push09:40
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A 17-year-old civil rights demonstrator, defying an anti-parade ordinance of Birmingham, Ala., is attacked by a police dog on May 3, 1963. President Kennedy discussed this photo, which had appeared on the front page of that day’s New York Times. (Bill Hudson/AP)
A 17-year-old civil rights demonstrator, defying an anti-parade ordinance of Birmingham, Ala., is attacked by a police dog on May 3, 1963. President Kennedy discussed this photo, which had appeared on the front page of that day’s New York Times. (Bill Hudson/AP)

As the 50th anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy approaches, we've been looking back on the legacy of the 35th president.

The 1960s, the civil rights movement and JFK's presidency are irrevocably linked. It was during a particularly turbulent time in that decade that Kennedy went on television to address the nation and propose passage of civil rights legislation.

He didn’t live to see it happen.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Delores Handy of WBUR looks at JFK and the civil rights movement.

Are you old enough to have memories of the Kennedy assassination? Share them in the comments or on our Facebook page.

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This segment aired on November 11, 2013.

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