CDC Issues New Guidance On Flu Vaccines07:28
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Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, receives a flu shot from Sharon Bonadies at the conclusion of a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014.  "Vaccination is the single most important step everyone 6 months of age and older can take to protect themselves and their families against influenza," said Frieden.  Influenza hospitalized a surprisingly high number of young and middle-aged adults last winter, and this time around the government wants more of them vaccinated. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)MoreCloseclosemore
Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, receives a flu shot from Sharon Bonadies at the conclusion of a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014. "Vaccination is the single most important step everyone 6 months of age and older can take to protect themselves and their families against influenza," said Frieden. Influenza hospitalized a surprisingly high number of young and middle-aged adults last winter, and this time around the government wants more of them vaccinated. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)

This year, doctors are recommending FluMist for children ages 2-8, and they say a new type of pneumonia shot is available for seniors along with the flu shot.

Although flu season peaks in mid-winter, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is already recommending people get vaccinated against the flu.

Each year, more than half of Americans don't get vaccinated.

Infectious disease specialist, Dr. William Schaffner joins Here & Now's Robin Young for more on flu season and the vaccines available.

Guest

  • Dr. William Schaffner, infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee.

This segment aired on September 22, 2014.

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