'It's Our Duty' To Welcome Salvadorans In The U.S. Back Home, Ambassador Says06:09
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Mario Escalante reads a newspaper during lunch at a local market in San Salvador, El Salvador, Monday, Jan. 8, 2018. The U.S. administration announced that it will end the temporary protected status that has allowed some 200,000 people from El Salvador to stay legally in the United States for nearly 17 years, the Department of Homeland Security, DHS, said Monday. The newspaper headline reads in Spanish "The United States will decide today the future of TPS." (Salvador Melendez/AP)MoreCloseclosemore
Mario Escalante reads a newspaper during lunch at a local market in San Salvador, El Salvador, Monday, Jan. 8, 2018. The U.S. administration announced that it will end the temporary protected status that has allowed some 200,000 people from El Salvador to stay legally in the United States for nearly 17 years, the Department of Homeland Security, DHS, said Monday. The newspaper headline reads in Spanish "The United States will decide today the future of TPS." (Salvador Melendez/AP)

Claudia Ivette Canjura, El Salvador's ambassador to the United States, is responding to the Trump administration's decision this week to end a program that protected 200,000 Salvadorans in the U.S. from deportation after devastating earthquakes in 2001.

Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd speaks with Canjura about the end of temporary protected status, and thousands of Salvadorans possibly returning to a country struggling with unemployment, poverty and gang violence.

This segment aired on January 11, 2018.

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