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Up In The Polls, Huntsman Continues N.H. Push

Republican presidential candidate, former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, stands on a counter during a campaign stop at the Bean Towne Coffee House on Sunday, Jan. 8 in Hampstead, N.H.  (AP)
Republican presidential candidate, former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, stands on a counter during a campaign stop at the Bean Towne Coffee House on Sunday, Jan. 8 in Hampstead, N.H. (AP)

In a bomber jacket and jeans, former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman hopped on the top of a counter in a coffee shop in Hampstead, N.H. on Sunday and shouted to the crowd, "I feel the surge!"

Huntsman said his election is about fixing the budget deficit and dealing with what he calls a trust deficit.

"There’s not going to be a coronation folks. There’s not going to be an establishment anointed candidate who steps in," Huntsman said. "You've got to earn the vote so we are going around the state and, you know what else, we need your help. Can I get your help?"

The latest poll shows Huntsman moving up to third place. He has staked his campaign on New Hampshire — hosting more than 160 public events in the state and winning the ardent support of Nicholas Delcore.

"A lot of the things strike home with me, you know, fixing the budget, ending the war in Afghanistan," Delcore said. "I definitely like what [Huntsman] has to say and I’m glad to see he’s really moving up in the polls."

Behind Huntsman in the polls are Newt Gingrich and finally Rick Santorum, who traveled to South Carolina Sunday after slipping to fifth place.

On Sunday Gingrich spoke to over 100 people at a Mexican restaurant where many of the questions focused on immigration. Gingrich explained his plan, unique among the Republicans in the primary, to allow undocumented immigrants a path to citizenship if they have been living the U.S. for an extended amount of time.

"We have to end a period of having people in the shadows," Gingrich said. "It's bad for the country, it’s bad for the people. It leads them to be exploited. It’s dangerous. It means those who need help don’t ask for it."

Other Republicans say this plan will make the U.S. a magnet for more illegal immigration.

This program aired on January 8, 2012. The audio for this program is not available.

Monica Brady-Myerov Twitter Reporter
Monica Brady-Myerov was formerly a report in WBUR's newsroom.

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