WBUR News

Support the news

N.H. Voters Share The Issues They're Voting For

Louise Graham, a retired school teacher who has lived in New Hampshire for 40 years, said her number one issue in this election is “working towards a more fair distribution of wealth.” (Hadley Green for WBUR)closemore
Louise Graham, a retired school teacher who has lived in New Hampshire for 40 years, said her number one issue in this election is “working towards a more fair distribution of wealth.” (Hadley Green for WBUR)

Ahead of Tuesday’s presidential primary, our photographers are asking New Hampshire voters what issue most resonates with them this election season. We’ll update this post over the weekend, as Tuesday approaches. Full primary coverage is here.

Manchester

Sarah and Brian Tierney, of Manchester, will be voting Republican this election cycle. Brian supports John Kasich and is most concerned with the federal deficit and wage disparity. Sarah isn’t sure who she will vote for, but is leaning toward Kasich. She is most concerned about immigration and the health of the middle class. (Joe Difazio for WBUR)
Sarah and Brian Tierney, of Manchester, will be voting Republican this election cycle. Brian supports John Kasich and is most concerned with the federal deficit and wage disparity. Sarah isn’t sure who she will vote for, but is leaning toward Kasich. She is most concerned about immigration and the health of the middle class. (Joe Difazio for WBUR)
Connor Cyrus, of Hanover, said that the most important thing for him this election is social issues, and having equal rights for everyone. As for who Cyrus is voting for, he said that he “feels the Bern.” (Joe Difazio for WBUR)
Connor Cyrus, of Hanover, said that the most important thing for him this election is social issues, and having equal rights for everyone. As for who Cyrus is voting for, he said that he “feels the Bern.” (Joe Difazio for WBUR)

Exeter

Doug Graham, 52, of Exeter, says his key issue in this election is "trying to get the Democrats out of the White House," and going back to a limited role of government, and a government that supports the military and business. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)
Doug Graham, 52, of Exeter, says his key issue in this election is "trying to get the Democrats out of the White House," and going back to a limited role of government, and a government that supports the military and business. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)
Tammy Mahoney, 52, of Kingston, says she's looking for a candidate who will clean up government and make it smaller. "Corruption, government, Washington not getting anything done," are her key issues, she says. "I'd like to see someone who can unite the country." (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)
Tammy Mahoney, 52, of Kingston, says she's looking for a candidate who will clean up government and make it smaller. "Corruption, government, Washington not getting anything done," are her key issues, she says. "I'd like to see someone who can unite the country." (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)
Bob Curtis, 26, of New Market, says the key issue for him this election is "super PACs, and the way that corporations and Wall Street buy the politicians." (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)
Bob Curtis, 26, of New Market, says the key issue for him this election is "super PACs, and the way that corporations and Wall Street buy the politicians." (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

Concord

Louise Graham, a retired school teacher who has lived in New Hampshire for 40 years, said her number one issue in this election is “working towards a more fair distribution of wealth.” (Hadley Green for WBUR)
Louise Graham, a retired school teacher who has lived in New Hampshire for 40 years, said her number one issue in this election is “working towards a more fair distribution of wealth.” (Hadley Green for WBUR)
Geoffrey Smith, a Bernie Sanders supporter, says his number one issue in this election is “climate change -- the general warming of the climate, strongly related to human activity.” (Hadley Green for WBUR)
Geoffrey Smith, a Bernie Sanders supporter, says his number one issue in this election is “climate change -- the general warming of the climate, strongly related to human activity.” (Hadley Green for WBUR)
Summer Olson’s number one issue in this election is abortion rights. “I really liked Jeb [Bush] at one point,” she said, “but then he said he’s against abortion.” Now Olson thinks she will support Hillary Clinton. (Hadley Green for WBUR)
Summer Olson’s number one issue in this election is abortion rights. “I really liked Jeb [Bush] at one point,” she said, “but then he said he’s against abortion.” Now Olson thinks she will support Hillary Clinton. (Hadley Green for WBUR)

Nashua

Frank Soto, 61, is a Vietnam veteran who resides in Nashua. He said the biggest issue for him is “taking care of the vets.” (Hadley Green for WBUR)
Frank Soto, 61, is a Vietnam veteran who resides in Nashua. He said the biggest issue for him is “taking care of the vets.” (Hadley Green for WBUR)
Shari Fritz, a 61-year-old New Hampshire resident, is concerned about gun laws. “I still want the right to carry my gun. I have a concealed weapons permit to protect myself." (Hadley Green for WBUR)
Shari Fritz, a 61-year-old New Hampshire resident, is concerned about gun laws. “I still want the right to carry my gun. I have a concealed weapons permit to protect myself." (Hadley Green for WBUR)
Sheryl Parker, 48, of Nashua, said her biggest issue this election is “taxes on the middle class.” (Hadley Green for WBUR)
Sheryl Parker, 48, of Nashua, said her biggest issue this election is “taxes on the middle class.” (Hadley Green for WBUR)

Tilton

Mark Dexter, right, seen here with John Katz, is concerned with protecting small businesses. “The government is helping people, but not the right people,” Dexter, of Northfield, said. (Hadley Green for WBUR)
Mark Dexter, right, seen here with John Katz, is concerned with protecting small businesses. “The government is helping people, but not the right people,” Dexter, of Northfield, said. (Hadley Green for WBUR)
Jim Auger says he probably won’t vote in this election. “People think the president is going to make a difference but they don’t. The whole political game is an illusion to make people feel like they have a say in government,” Auger said. (Hadley Green for WBUR)
Jim Auger says he probably won’t vote in this election. “People think the president is going to make a difference but they don’t. The whole political game is an illusion to make people feel like they have a say in government,” Auger said. (Hadley Green for WBUR)
This election, Kimberly Chadwick is concerned with “income disparity, which affects absolutely everything.” (Hadley Green for WBUR)
This election, Kimberly Chadwick is concerned with “income disparity, which affects absolutely everything.” (Hadley Green for WBUR)
Devin Norton would like politicians to focus more on people in America. “Why are we helping homeless people in other countries when we could be taking care of homeless people here?” Norton said. “There are homeless people in Lincoln.” (Hadley Green for WBUR)
Devin Norton would like politicians to focus more on people in America. “Why are we helping homeless people in other countries when we could be taking care of homeless people here?” Norton said. “There are homeless people in Lincoln.” (Hadley Green for WBUR)
Linda Davis Amsden’s biggest issue this election is government financial waste. “They’re spending money in the wrong places,” Amsden, of Sanbornton, said. (Hadley Green for WBUR)
Linda Davis Amsden’s biggest issue this election is government financial waste. “They’re spending money in the wrong places,” Amsden, of Sanbornton, said. (Hadley Green for WBUR)
+Join the discussion
Share

Support the news

Next Up

Where to now?

More WBUR News or Explore Audio.