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Slow And Steady: Vinyl Survives05:41

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A 12-inch record tips onto the spindle at EKS Manufacturing. (Jacob Ganz)closemore
A 12-inch record tips onto the spindle at EKS Manufacturing. (Jacob Ganz)

In recent years some headlines have cast an increase in sales for vinyl LPs — once considered a casualty of the CD era — as something like a beacon of hope for the struggling music industry. The reality isn't all that rosy. Though vinyl sales grew by 14% in 2010, according to Nielsen SoundScan, they still counted for less than one percent of the year's total album sales.

But vinyl has never really gone away. It's just meant different things to different generations. Today, for the most part, that means fans of indie rock. According to that Nielsen end-of-the-year report, here are the top ten vinyl albums of 2010, with sales figures in parentheses:

Keith Abrahamsson (left) and Andres Santo Domingo in the Mexican Summer store in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. (Jacob Ganz)
Keith Abrahamsson (left) and Andres Santo Domingo in the Mexican Summer store in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. (Jacob Ganz)

    The newest press at EKS makes colored specialty vinyl, which begins its life as tiny pellets of polyvinyl chloride in pink, blue, red, green, white or black. (Jacob Ganz)
    The newest press at EKS makes colored specialty vinyl, which begins its life as tiny pellets of polyvinyl chloride in pink, blue, red, green, white or black. (Jacob Ganz)
    EKS owner Will Socolov holds a stamper — half of a pair of nickel plated discs with a spiral ridge to press a groove into one side of soft vinyl. (Jacob Ganz)
    EKS owner Will Socolov holds a stamper — half of a pair of nickel plated discs with a spiral ridge to press a groove into one side of soft vinyl. (Jacob Ganz)
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