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In Reversal, Vikings Will Keep Peterson Off The Field

Adrian Peterson has been placed on the exempt-commissioner's permission list, which means he will not be able to participate in team activities. (Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images)MoreCloseclosemore
Adrian Peterson has been placed on the exempt-commissioner's permission list, which means he will not be able to participate in team activities. (Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images)

Adrian Peterson will not rejoin the Minnesota Vikings anytime soon. In an announcement Wednesday morning, the team reversed its position on the star running back who's facing child abuse charges.

Owners Mark and Zygi Wilf announced that Peterson will be placed on the Exempt/Commissioner's permission list, which means he will not able to participate in team activities until his legal situation is resolved.

"After giving the situation additional thought, we have decided this is the appropriate course of action for the organization and for Adrian," the owners said in a written statement.

[sidebar title="Scandals Soar, Ratings Rise" width="630" align="right"]If Sunday Night Football is any indication, the controversies in the NFL aren't keeping fans from watching.[/sidebar]The running back could now miss the entire season, the Associated Press reports.

Peterson is accused of beating his 4-year-old son with a stick. Peterson says he was disciplining the child.

Peterson was charged last Friday and did not play in the Vikings' 30-7 loss to the New England Patriots on Sunday. Prior to Wednesday's announcement, the owners had said Monday that Peterson would rejoin the team.

"We believe this is a matter of due process and we should allow the legal system to proceed so we can come to the most effective conclusions and then determine the appropriate course of action," the Wilfs said Monday.

As word spread that Peterson might return to the team as soon as Week 3, fans and team sponsors were critical of the news.

From the Associated Press:

The Radisson hotel chain suspended its sponsorship with the Vikings, Papa John's considered doing the same, and Anheuser-Busch said it was "disappointed and increasingly concerned" with the negative attention brought to the league by Ray Rice's assault on his wife and Peterson's arrest.

Castrol Motor Oil, Special Olympics Minnesota and Mylan Inc. all severed ties with Peterson, and Twin Cities Nike stores pulled Peterson's jerseys from its shelves.

On Wednesday morning, according to ESPN's Darren Rovell, Nike "suspended" its endorsement agreement with Peterson. It's not clear if Peterson could return to his role with the company.


Peterson is not, of course, the only NFL running back currently embroiled in an abuse scandal. Last week, Rice was suspended from the NFL indefinitely after video surfaced of the former Ravens running back punching his then-fiance.

On Tuesday, the NFL players union announced it is appealing Rice's suspension.

Earlier Coverage: 

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