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The Media Artillery36:17
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photoNews organizations have embedded reporters on the battlefield. Live briefings are coming in by the hour. The war coverage is continuous. But are Americans well-served by the U.S. media's coverage of Gulf War II?

Syracuse University professor Bob Thompson says that the large volume of the coverage does not necessarily mean the incoming information is depicting an objective, well-rounded and complete picture of the war.

Geneva Overholser, Hurley Chair in Public Affairs Reporting at the Missouri Journalism School's Washington Bureau, says that the American media is not showing how the rest of the world perceives the war, and that it lacks independent coverage of the conflict.

Click the "Listen" link to hear more about the American media's coverage of the war and how it's affecting the American public's view of the war.

Guests:

Geneva Overholser, Hurley Chair in Public Affairs Reporting at the Missouri Journalism School's Washington Bureau

Bob Thompson, Professor of Media and Popular Culture at Syracuse University and founding director of the Center for the Study of Popular Television

Christopher Hanson, Assistant Professor at the Philip Merrill
College of Journalism at the University of Maryland and a 20-year print journalist, working as a combat correspondent in the First Gulf War and Rwanda

Jack Beatty, On Point News Analyst and Senior Editor at the Atlantic Monthly magazine

This program aired on March 26, 2003.

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