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Mexico's Vote and the U.S.44:03
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photoFor seventy years, democracy in Mexico was a one-party joke. In 2000, Vicente Fox challenged that party, won, and launched a new era. Now, in 2006, Mexico's had a new presidential election, a razor-thin claim of victory, and is a deeply-divided country on the southern US border.

No one got a majority. Tally sheets give free-marketeer Felipe Calderon a tiny edge. Anti-poverty crusader Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador says he was robbed.

Thousands filled the Mexican capitol's main square over the weekend to protest. No president-elect has been declared. What should the United States hope for here?

Hear about Mexico's contested election, and what the outcome means for the USA.

Guests:

Dudley Althaus, Bureau Chief for the Los Angeles Times

Pamela Starr, Latin-America, Mexico Analyst at Eurasia Group

Manuel Suarez-Mier, Professor of Economics and Finance at American University

Ilan Stavans, author of "The Hispanic Condition."

This program aired on July 10, 2006.

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