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What's Next for TV45:39
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Screen shot from Hulu.com.
Screen shot from Hulu.com.

The latest Nielsen report shows household TV viewing at a record eight hours and eighteen minutes a day. The average American household now has more televisions than people. And many more ways to watch, beyond the television: on the PC, the laptop, the iPod, the cell phone — on Hulu.

Maybe it’s the recession ... that we can’t afford to go out. Maybe it’s that screens are everywhere. Maybe television viewing’s triumph is traditional TV’s last hurrah.

This hour, On Point: The triumph of screens, and where TV goes now.

You can join the conversation. Are you watching more? And in more places? More ways? Are your viewing patterns and relationship with TV, with video, changing? How? Tell us.Guests:

Frank Rose, contributing editor at Wired magazine and author of the blog Deep Media.  He’s working on a book, "Welcome to the Hyperdrome," about how story-telling is evolving in the Internet age.

James Poniewozik, TV critic for Time magazine. He writes the Tuned In column, about pop culture and society, as well as the Tuned In blog.

Douglas Rushkoff, author of ten best-selling books on new media and popular culture, including "Cyberia," "Media Virus," "Playing the Future," and "Coercion," winner of the 2002 Marshall McLuhan Award.

More links:

Here's the Los Angeles Times on Nielsen's new "three screens" report: "Television, Internet and Mobile Usage in the U.S." Read the full report here (PDF).

See Frank Rose's Wired article "Free, Legal and Online: Why Hulu Is the New Way to Watch TV." The New York Times's Virginia Heffernan also wrote about Hulu in a recent column.

This program aired on February 26, 2009.

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