Support the news

Elie Wiesel23:46
Download

Play
Elie Wiesel attends the premiere of 'The Reader' at the Ziegfeld Theater on Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2008 in New York. (AP)
Elie Wiesel attends the premiere of 'The Reader' at the Ziegfeld Theater on Wednesday, Dec. 3, 2008 in New York. (AP)

He emerged, to make a life of powerful witness and remembrance. His memoir “Night” introduced millions to the horrors of the Nazi death camps.

Now, at 80, his moral investigation of that horror, and its aftermath, goes on. Elie Wiesel is still fighting for morality. Still fighting for remembrance.

This hour, On Point: Elie Wiesel and his new novel “A Mad Desire to Dance.”

You can join us. Has Elie Wiesel been your guide through the moral implications, the nightmare, of the Holocaust? What’s your question for him today?Guest:

Elie Wiesel joins us from St. Petersberg, Florida. Author, activist, Holocaust survivor, and winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, Wiesel is professor of humanities at Boston University and is one of our era’s greatest thinkers on modern morality, and its failings. His new novel is "A Mad Desire to Dance." You can read an excerpt at RandomHouse.com.

Wiesel has spoken out recently on the Bernard Madoff scandal, which cost him — and many others — dearly. See a transcript of his comments about Madoff on today's show.

This program aired on March 11, 2009.

Tom Ashbrook Twitter Former Host, On Point
Tom Ashbrook is an award-winning journalist and host of WBUR and NPR's On Point.

More…

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news