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'Climategate' and Public Opinion24:13
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A sign reads "Hopenhagen Earth Body Guard" on a building in the center of Copenhagen, Denmark, on Sunday Dec. 6, 2009, one day before the U.N. Climate Summit begins. (AP)
A sign reads "Hopenhagen Earth Body Guard" on a building in the center of Copenhagen, Denmark, on Sunday Dec. 6, 2009, one day before the U.N. Climate Summit begins. (AP)

And so, Copenhagen has begun. Nearly 200 nations — and 110 heads of state. The biggest climate change summit anywhere, ever. All focused on trying to save the planet from frying in its own human-generated carbon emissions.
One wrinkle: the latest U.S. polls show Americans less persuaded than in years of the human role — even as scientists warn more urgently of the danger. And as climate scientists’ own e-mails have opened them to attack.
This hour, On Point: Global warming, public opinion, and stolen e-mails, as the curtain goes up in Copenhagen.
You can join the conversation. Tell us what you think — here on this page, on Twitter, and on Facebook.Guests:

Juliet Eilperin, environmental reporter at The Washington Post. She is flying to Copenhagen this morning to attend the Climate Summit. Her most recent article on the stolen e-mail story is "Scientist Steps Down During e-mail Probe".

Michael Mann, director of the Earth Systems Science Center and a professor in the department of meteorology at Pennsylvania State University. His email exchanges were included in the stolen files.

Carroll Doherty, associate editorial director at the Pew Research Center for People and the Press. Pew recently conducted a poll on public opinion about global warming.

More links:
The e-mails stolen from the Climate Research Unit (CRU) at the University of East Anglia have been posted here.
"In Face of Skeptics, Experts Affirm Climate Peril" — a front-page story in today's New York Times by Andrew Revkin and John Broder reports on reactions to the stolen climate e-mails on the eve of the Copenhagen summit.

This program aired on December 7, 2009.

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