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Moscow, Washington and Nukes24:14
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Russian troops are seen near truck-mounted Topol-M intercontinental ballistic missiles as they rehearse for the Victory Day parade in Moscow's Red Square, at a training field in the town of Alabino outside Moscow, Tuesday, March 18, 2008. (AP)
Russian troops are seen near truck-mounted Topol-M intercontinental ballistic missiles as they rehearse for the Victory Day parade in Moscow's Red Square, at a training field in the town of Alabino outside Moscow, Tuesday, March 18, 2008. (AP)

Sorrow in Moscow today for the 39 dead in terror attacks on the Moscow subway.
Those attacks have muted the response to a breakthrough on a much bigger threat of terror and destruction. The United States and Russia still sit on giant Cold War-era stockpiles of ready-to-go nuclear weapons. On Friday, the leaders of the two countries agreed to a 30 percent cut in those American and Russian arsenals.
The deal may bolster global non-proliferation efforts. It may help keep loose nukes out of the terrorist world.
This hour, On Point: the big terror, nuclear weapons, and the new U.S.-Russia deal.

Guests:

Joining us from Moscow is Clifford Levy, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and Moscow Bureau Chief for The New York Times.

Joining us in our studio is Graham Allison, director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard’s Kennedy School. He served as Assistant Secretary of Defense in the first Clinton Administration and Special Advisor to the Secretary of Defense under President Reagan. He's author of the book "Nuclear Terrorism: The Ultimate Preventable Catastrophe." His recent piece for Foreign Policy magazine is "A Failure to Imagine the Worst." His article in the January/February issue of Foreign Affairs is "Nuclear Disorder: Surveying Atomic Threats."

And from Moscow we're joined by Dmitri Trenin, director of the Moscow Center of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He served in the Soviet and Russian armed forces from 1972 to 1993, where he was, among other things, a member of the delegation to the U.S.-Soviet nuclear arms talks in Geneva from 1985 to 1991. He also taught at the war studies department of Russia’s Military Institute from 1986 to 1993.

This program aired on March 30, 2010.

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