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Japan After The Quake46:21
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How the quake and its trauma may reshape Japan.

Members of Japan's Self Defense Force search the rubble of Shizugawa, in Northeastern Japan. (AP)
Members of Japan's Self Defense Force search the rubble of Shizugawa, in Northeastern Japan. (AP)

Japan is no stranger to natural disaster and struggling back.  From shogun, samurai days and far earlier, the Japanese have faced earthquake and tsunami and war, and famously persevered.

But some epic events have changed Japan, within that perseverance. The shocking arrival of Westerners in steam ships and the pummeling, atomic end of World War 2.

What about this time?  The triple blow of quake, tsunami and melting, belching nuclear plants?  Will this change Japan?

This hour, On Point:  Japan, after the quake.
- Tom Ashbrook
Guests:

Ian Buruma, professor of democracy, human rights, and journalism at Bard College, and author of "Taming the Gods: Religion and Democracy on Three Continents." Read his essay, "Japan's Shattered Mirror," in the Wall Street Journal.

Richard Samuels, professor of political science and director of the Center for International Studies at MIT, and founding director of their Japan program.  Author of "Securing Japan: Tokyo’s Grand Strategy and the Future of East Asia."

This program aired on March 24, 2011.

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