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A New Low For Arctic Ice55:09
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This summer, the Arctic ice cap shrank—melted-- to an all-time tiny size. Half what it was in 1980.  The planet is changing. We explore.

This image made available by NASA shows the amount of summer sea ice in the Arctic on Sunday, Sept. 16, 2012, at center in white, and the 1979 to 2000 average extent for the day shown, with the yellow line. (AP /U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center)
This image made available by NASA shows the amount of summer sea ice in the Arctic on Sunday, Sept. 16, 2012, at center in white, and the 1979 to 2000 average extent for the day shown, with the yellow line. (AP /U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center)

Guests

David Robinson, climatologist and professor in the department of geography at Rutgers University.

Walt Meier, research scientist at the National Snow & Ice Data Center, which has been measuring the Arctic sea ice cover since 1979.

From Tom's Reading List

New York Times "The apparent low point for 2012 was reached Sunday, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center, which said that sea ice that day covered about 1.32 million square miles, or 24 percent, of the surface of the Arctic Ocean. The previous low, set in 2007, was 29 percent."

Scientific American  "That difference between the previous record and this year’s is larger than the entire state of California, and almost as large as the state of Texas.  An ice-free summer in the Arctic, once projected to be more than a century away, now looks possible decades from now. Some say that it looks likely in just the next few years."

Links

Greenpeace’s Arctic Sunrise ship uploads a new image every minute. Here it’s at anchor in Longyearbyen, Norway.

Video

http://youtu.be/axsSexPoSR0

http://youtu.be/6Hv4S90UOBY

This program aired on September 24, 2012.

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