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Jindal, Portman And The GOP Leaders Of Today46:49

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The future of the GOP from Obamacare to 2016. We’ll talk to Ohio Senator Rob Portman and Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal.

Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH) and Gov. Bobby Jindal (R-LA) are two leading voices in the Republican Party. (AP)
Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH) and Gov. Bobby Jindal (R-LA) are two leading voices in the Republican Party. (AP)

Seven months before Election Day, Republicans suddenly are filled with optimism. President Obama’s ratings are down; the GOP’s chances of winning the Senate are up. Has the party has solved its problems with – with young people, Hispanics, and women? Or is it just masking them in a mid-term election where older whites are more likely to vote? We’ll ask two of the party’s new young leaders – a senator from Ohio almost picked as the VP candidate in 2012, and a governor from Louisiana who may seek the White House in 2016. This hour On Point: are Republicans back?

Guests

Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH), junior U.S. Senator representing the state of Ohio. (@robportman)

Gov. Bobby Jindal (R-LA), governor of the state of Louisiana. (@BobbyJindal)

Antonia Ferrier, Republican strategist. Senior vice president at Forbes-Tates, a lobbying group. She was communications director for Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT), and has worked for former Senators Bill Frist (R-TN), Olympia Snowe (R-ME), Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO) and House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH).(@ahrferrier)

From The Reading List

Associated Press: 2016 Campaign Checklist: Jindal — "Had to scrap ambitious plan to replace Louisiana's corporate and personal income taxes with higher sales taxes because of strong opposition. THAT speech: No doubt critics will be happy to dredge up video of disastrous GOP response to Barack Obama's first presidential address to Congress in 2009, a prime showcase that went awry when Jindal delivered a dud."

Washington Post: In the ‘credentials caucus,’ GOP’s 2016 hopefuls study policy and seek advisers — "Over meals, on the phone and in one-on-one chats, the rivals are building relationships with people they hope to recruit to help them navigate a range of issues. Policy leaders are generally hesitant to align with a candidate this far out, but the meetings send signals to would-be donors and operatives about the seriousness and direction of a potential candidacy."

Slate: The Bush Schism — "The argument for a Bush run is that he has a governor’s executive skills, can forge a relationship with crucial Hispanic voters (particularly in a key swing state), and has a fundraising base founded, in part, on a reservoir of goodwill toward the Bush family. Republicans are sick of being out of the White House and want a winner. Perhaps, but Bush is also the perfect candidate if your goal is driving simultaneous wedges into as many fault lines in the Republican Party as possible."

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