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Egypt’s Transformation, Before And After Morsi’s Fall47:36
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Sentenced to death in Egypt for espionage, respected academic Emad Shahin joins us with a big take on Egypt, ISIS and America’s response.

Ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi raises his hands as he sits behind glass in a courtroom, in a converted lecture hall in the national police academy in an eastern Cairo suburb, Egypt, Saturday, May 16, 2015. (AP)
Ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi raises his hands as he sits behind glass in a courtroom, in a converted lecture hall in the national police academy in an eastern Cairo suburb, Egypt, Saturday, May 16, 2015. (AP)

Emad Shahin is a serious man. An Egyptian. A scholar. A reformer. With a death sentence hanging over him. Last year, as Egypt’s military pushed back into power, Shahin’s house in Cairo was surrounded at dawn. His wife screamed “They’re here. They’re here. They are coming to take you!” Shahin fled. Now he’s in America. Condemned to death in Egypt. And thinking about the whole roiling region, from Egypt to ISIS to Iran. The Saudis, the Israelis, and above all the Americans and their role. This hour On Point: a serious man, a condemned man, on America and the Middle East.
-- Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Emad Shahin, professor at the American University in Cairo. Visiting professor of political science at the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Editor-in-chief of the Oxford Encyclopedia of Islam and Politics. (@emadshahin)

From Tom’s Reading List

The Wall Street Journal: Iraqi Forces, Militias Launch Attacks to Drive Islamic State From Ramadi — "Military and paramilitary forces launched attacks around Ramadi in what the government called the start of an offensive against Islamic State in Iraq’s biggest province, a high-stakes campaign that hands Iran-backed militias the lead role against the Sunni extremists."

POMEAS: Egypt and the Politics of Token Reforms -- "In light of the sharp polarization that is dividing society and the political community, Egypt needs an inclusive political system that allows for effective political participation and a locally driven economic revival. Mubarak’s regime, despite its economic successes, became increasingly exclusionary and blocked the institutional avenues for real political change."

Al Jazeera America: Stating security concerns, Egypt gags media -- "Egypt, which has changed regimes twice in the past four years, was ranked by the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) as the world's third-deadliest country for journalists in 2013, and the world's sixth-worst jailer of journalists in 2014. According to RWB, Egypt was fifth-worst in jailing reporters in 2014."

This program aired on May 28, 2015.

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