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Week In The News: Primary Poll Surprises, Shaky Markets, Iran Prisoner Swap48:24

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With guest host Jane Clayson.

Palin endorses Trump. Sanders surges in New Hampshire. Jittery stocks. Iran prisoner swap. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, left, endorses Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a rally at the Iowa State University, Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016, in Ames, Iowa. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, left, endorses Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a rally at the Iowa State University, Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016, in Ames, Iowa. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Ten days to the Iowa caucuses: Palin endorses Trump. Ted Cruz battles the GOP establishment. Sanders surges in New Hampshire. Clinton turns up the heat. Obama says it’s a “good day” and “milestone” as many Iranian sanctions are lifted and five American prisoners are released. At home, markets wobble. Flint, Michigan gets an apology from Governor Snyder. This hour On Point, our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.
-- Jane Clayson

Guests

Michael Crowley, senior foreign affairs correspondent at POLITICO. (@michaelcrowley)

Amy Walter, national editor for the Cook Political Report. (@amyewalter)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst. (@JackBeattyNPR)

From The Reading List

POLITICO: The man Obama asked to defeat the Islamic State -- "Since Malley took over the national security council’s Middle East job in March, the Obama administration has shown more tolerance for letting Assad hang on for several months, possibly into mid-2017. Obama is trying to broker a political settlement to the Syrian conflict but insists it must pave the way for Assad’s exit."

Cook Political Report: Trump's Support Among Non-GOP Voters is Not as Problematic as We Think -- "In the 38 states and territories that vote before April 1st, less than half (seventeen) are restricted to only those who are registered as Republican. Some, like New Hampshire and Massachusetts allow a combination of those who are registered Republican and those who are unaffiliated or independent, to participate. Some states, like Virginia, have so called 'loyalty pledges' which require a voter to sign a statement affirming they are a Republican (there is no party registration in Virginia). While there is no enforcement mechanism to these pledges, they can serve to intimidate or dissuade non-party regulars from participation."

New York Times: As Water Problems Grew, Officials Belittled Complaints From Flint — "It was not until late in 2015, after months of complaints, that state officials finally conceded what critics had been contending: that Flint was in the midst of a major public health emergency, as tap water pouring into families’ homes contained enough lead to show up in the blood of dozens of people in the city. Even small amounts of lead could cause lasting health and developmental problems in children."

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