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Orlando And The Threat Of The Lone Wolf45:30
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With guest host Jane Clayson.

After the Orlando shooting, lone wolf attacks on soft targets. How to defend against an insidious terrorist threat.

Two women place flowers for the victims of the fatal shootings at Pulse Orlando nightclub at a makeshift memorial Monday, June 13, 2016, in Orlando, Fla. (Chris O'Meara / AP)
Two women place flowers for the victims of the fatal shootings at Pulse Orlando nightclub at a makeshift memorial Monday, June 13, 2016, in Orlando, Fla. (Chris O'Meara / AP)

Lone wolf. Soft target. Again. This time in Orlando. The American-born killer opened fire and pledged allegiance to ISIS. The FBI was on him for a while. But determining who is really a threat is like looking for a needle in a national haystack. ISIS is telling followers to “open the door of jihad” wherever they live. So, how do you stop that? Does the U.S. need a new strategy? This hour On Point, the lone wolf strikes again. — Jane Clayson

Guests

Jamie Yuccas, correspondent for CBS News. (@jamieyuccas)

Peter Bergen, vice president at New America. National security analyst for CNN. Author of the book, "United States of Jihad." Professor of practice at Arizona State University. (@peterbergencnn)

Michael Smith II, co-founder of the security firm, Kronos Advisory. Counter-terrorism advisor to members of Congress. (@michaelssmithii)

From The Reading List

The Daily Beast: Omar Mateen Called 911 and Pledged Allegiance to ISIS — "Two law-enforcement officials told The Daily Beast that immediately before starting his rampage, Omar Mateen called 911 and pledged his allegiance to the self-proclaimed Islamic State. (A similar pledge was made online by the San Bernardino terrorists before they shot and killed 14 people last year.)"

CNN: The real terror threat in America is homegrown — "The homegrown terror threat poses a knotty problem for U.S. law enforcement, as lone wolves are not communicating via email or on the phone with foreign terrorist organizations, the type of communications that can be intercepted by the U.S. intelligence community. Nor do they have meetings with co-conspirators of the type that can be monitored by the FBI."

WCBD-NBC: Local counter terrorism expert weighs in on Orlando shooting & ISIS — "Smith wants the public to understand they aren’t helpless in the fight against extremists and that law enforcement will not stigmatize someone if they report suspicious behavior they feel could be terrorism related."

This program aired on June 15, 2016.

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