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Drought-Stricken California Seeks A 'Waterfix'06:02
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In this photo taken April 10, 2017, birds fly over the Kings River swollen with water from rain and melting snow in the Sierra Nevada near Hanford, Calif. State officials have lifted the drought emergency for much of the state, but drought has yet to loosen its grip on thousands of resident in the San Joaquin Valley where domestic wells have run dry, forcing them to wash and flush toilets with water from tanks next to their homes. (AP Photo/Scott Smith)MoreCloseclosemore
In this photo taken April 10, 2017, birds fly over the Kings River swollen with water from rain and melting snow in the Sierra Nevada near Hanford, Calif. State officials have lifted the drought emergency for much of the state, but drought has yet to loosen its grip on thousands of resident in the San Joaquin Valley where domestic wells have run dry, forcing them to wash and flush toilets with water from tanks next to their homes. (AP Photo/Scott Smith)

California needs to bring water to some of its nearly 40 million people. One ambitious water-delivery project involving a tunnel was recently scaled back by billions of dollars. On Monday morning, we'll look at California's proposed $10 billion "Waterfix."

Guest:

Bettina Boxall, reporter covering water issues and the environment for the Los Angeles Times. (@Boxall)

From The Reading List:

Los Angeles Times: California Moves Ahead With One Delta Tunnel, Scaling Back Ambitious Water Delivery Project — "Pitched as as a $17-billion, two-tunnel fix for the ecologically failing delta, the decade-old proposal has been reduced to one tunnel that will cost $10.7 billion.

State officials Wednesday said they will press ahead with a smaller version of a long-planned water delivery project, initially building one, instead of two, massive tunnels in the heart of California's vast waterworks."

This segment aired on February 12, 2018.

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