All Things Considered
All Things Considered

On Links As In Life, D.C. Bipartisan Relations Are Deep In The Rough

Golf is a sport that's been enjoyed by both Democrats and Republicans through the decades, but bipartisan golf outings may be disappearing like a shanked tee shot into a water hazard.

All Things Considered

Hillary Clinton Supports Amendment To Get Hidden Money Out Of Politics

Clinton called campaign finance reform one of the "four big fights" of her campaign. But does this idea of a constitutional amendment to restrict or eliminate big money stand a chance?

All Things Considered

NBA Players Union Head Michele Roberts Says No Lockout Expected

NPR's Audie Cornish interviews Michele Roberts who is the first woman to head a major North American professional sports union — the National Basketball Players Association.

All Things Considered

Syrian Government Believed To Be Behind Chlorine Gas Attack

NPR's Robert Siegel talks with chemical weapons expert Amy Smithson about the use of chlorine gas as a weapon in Syria. She says it is a violation of the Chemical Weapons Convention.

All Things Considered

Remembering Don Quayle, NPR's First President

The first president of NPR has died at the age of 84. Don Quayle had a long career in public broadcasting, both in television and radio. Susan Stamberg reflects on his impact on NPR and her career.

All Things Considered

Bill Arhos, 'Austin City Limits' Founder, Dies At 80

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Terry Lickona, executive producer of Austin City Limits, about the life and legacy of the show's founder, Bill Arhos. Arhos died Saturday at 80.

All Things Considered

A Tart Take On Bitter Realities In 'Tangerines'

NPR's Bob Mondello reviews Tangerines, an unconventional war drama that was this year's Estonian nominee for Best Foreign Language Film.

All Things Considered

Book Review: Rachel Kushner, 'The Strange Case Of Rachel K'

NPR's Alan Cheuse reviews author Rachel Kushner's collection of short stories, The Strange Case of Rachel K.

All Things Considered

Physicians Urge Columbia To Fire Dr. Oz For Promoting 'Quack Treatments'

NPR's Robert Siegel speaks with Michael Specter, staff writer at The New Yorker about some physicians' calls for Columbia University to sever ties with TV's Dr. Oz.

All Things Considered

Verizon Announces Changes To Its Cable TV Service

Starting next week, Verizon customers can choose from a slimmed-down menu of options for a lower price. It's a big change for the industry, which has resisted flexible pricing models for years.

All Things Considered

'Star Wars' Fans Gear Up For New Film At Convention

Star Wars fans are gathering this week for the annual Star Wars Celebration fan convention in Anaheim, Calif.

All Things Considered

Univision's Popular Variety Show, 'Sabado Gigante,' To End After 53 Years

Univision's Spanish-language television staple, Sábado Gigante, will end its run after 53 years on the air.

All Things Considered

Actors' Equity Minimum Wage Proposal Could Threaten LA's Small Theaters

Actors' Equity Theater members are set to vote on whether to require small theaters in Los Angeles to pay equity minimum wage. But some actors say this could force cash-strapped theaters to close.

All Things Considered

Week In Politics: Trans-Pacific Partnership, 2016 Presidential Candidates

NPR's Robert Siegel speaks with political commentators E.J. Dionne of the Washington Post and Brookings Institution and David Brooks of The New York Times about progress on trade in Congress.

All Things Considered

Lawmakers Approve Bill To Help Finalize Asia-Pacific Trade Deal

Senate negotiators move forward on legislation that would give President Obama the authority to negotiate a sweeping trade accord. That deal, however, will align Obama with Republicans and pit him against Democrats.

All Things Considered

As Lake Mead Levels Drop, The West Braces For Bigger Drought Impact

Near Las Vegas, levels in the nation's largest reservoir have dropped 140 feet since 2000. Water deliveries to Nevada, Arizona and California may soon be rationed — and farmers would feel it first.

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