Morning Edition
Morning Edition

Teen Proves Art Is In The 'Eye' Of The Beholder

Not impressed by some of the art in San Francisco's Museum of Modern Art, a teen had an idea: set eye glasses on the wooden floor and walk away. Sure enough, people surrounded the "new exhibit."

Morning Edition

Indy 500 Milk Preference Poll

It's a time-honored tradition, win the Indianapolis 500 and down an ice-cold bottle of milk. What kind? According to the website Jalopnik.com, each driver has his own choice, should he win.

Morning Edition

Trump's Primary Support Gathers Steam Ahead Of Republican Convention

Donald Trump spent this week campaigning in states with upcoming primaries. The presumptive GOP nominee has been strengthening elements of his campaign. But his tone remains the same.

Morning Edition

Hockey Night In Canada Punjabi Edition

David Greene talks to Harnarayan Singh, play-by-play voice for Hockey Night In Canada Punjabi Edition. Singh's dramatic calls have won him fans even beyond Canada's large Punjabi speaking minority.

Morning Edition

Baylor Fires University President, Football Coach Over Sexual Assault Scandal

President Kenneth Starr and coach Art Briles are being removed following a scathing report on sexual assaults by players against other students; failure of university officials to help the victims.

Morning Edition

Refugee Crisis Is A Hot-Button Issue For EU Voters

Across Europe there seems to be a rejection of mainstream parties with a rush of migrants. Renee Montagne talks to Norbert Rottgen, chairman of the foreign affairs committee of Germany's Parliament.

Morning Edition

N.C. Businesses Deal With Fallout From 'Bathroom' Law

Businesses say they're still dealing with the fallout of a new law that blocked protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. Start-ups say investors are steering clear of the state.

Morning Edition

Obama Visits Hiroshima, Which Symbolizes Atomic Age Horrors

Morning Edition talks to NPR's Scott Horsley and Elise Hu, Sheila Smith of the Council on Foreign Relations, Rep. Mark Takano of California and Kikue Takagi who survived the attack on Hiroshima.

Morning Edition

'Presenting Princess Shaw': The Unlikely Story Of Samantha Montgomery

Samantha Montgomery is an elder-care worker in New Orleans who also writes and sings her own songs on YouTube. A composer in Israel spotted her and via social media, they began to work together.

Morning Edition

2 Finalists Crowned Champions At Scripps National Spelling Bee

It's the third straight year that the bee has had two winners. Renee Montagne and David Greene report on former winners, and what impact winning the bee has had on their lives.

Morning Edition

Planet Money Tracks Down The Inventor Of The Open Office

Open office plans have become common. Our Planet Money teams has the story of the man who came up with the idea to tear down cubicle walls, and why he thought it was a good idea.

Morning Edition

Examining Obama's Nuclear Legacy

In Hiroshima, Obama plans to update his vision for ridding the world of nuclear weapons. Nuclear doves say they're underwhelmed with Obama's record on reducing the size of the U.S. nuclear stockpile.

Morning Edition

Arizona Joins Transgender Directive Suit, School Board Should Set Policy

Renee Montagne talks to Arizona Superintendent of Education Diane Douglas about the federal directive that transgender students be allowed to use the restrooms corresponding to their gender identity.

Morning Edition

A First By A Sitting U.S. President: Obama Goes to Hiroshima

Hiroshima was destroyed in the first atomic bomb attack. Morning Edition talks to NPR's Scott Horsley and Elise Hu and Sheila Smith, expert in Japanese politics with the Council on Foreign Relations.

Morning Edition

A POW Dad And His Family's Fierce, Loving Allegiance

James Stockdale is best remembered for being the running mate of millionaire Ross Perot in 1992. Stockdale's son remembers him as a Vietnam POW and war hero.

Morning Edition

With Shuttles Gone, Private Ventures Give Florida's Space Coast A Lift

Five years after NASA's shuttle program ended, a new Florida aerospace industry is beginning to take shape. Firms, from those making jets to tiny Internet satellites, are adding factories and jobs.

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