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What The Lobster Population Means For The Fishing Industry — And Your Wallet24:08
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Sternman Scott Beede returns an undersized lobster while checking traps in Mount Desert, Maine. (AP)
Sternman Scott Beede returns an undersized lobster while checking traps in Mount Desert, Maine. (AP)

It's summer, so that means lobster — that juicy, tender meat you so love. But what we as consumers get at our table has a deeper story behind it.

South of the Cape, in places like Long Island Sound, the lobster population has dropped from 3.7 million in 1998 to 142,000 in 2011. But up north in Maine, there's a boom — so much so that prices have fallen dramatically, coming down to $2 per pound.

And all of this has ripple effects for consumers, fishermen and state industries. Could your lobster dinner make or break another's livelihood? We'll explore the New England lobster industry — from the decimation in the southern waters to the glut in the northern waters.

Guests:

  • Bill Adler, Executive Director of the Massachusetts Lobstermen's Association and serves on the Massachusetts Marine Fisheries Commission
  • Penny Howell, a marine biologist with the Marine Fisheries Division of Connecticut and the stock assessment subcommittee of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission
  • Jason Joyce, an 8th generation lobsterman of Swan's Island, Maine

Related:

This segment aired on July 23, 2012.

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