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Gov. Patrick's New Climate Change Plan07:07Download

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The sun rises in Seaside Heights, N.J. behind the Jet Star Roller Coaster which has been sitting in the ocean after part of the Funtown Pier was destroyed during Superstorm Sandy. (Mel Evans/AP)MoreCloseclosemore
The sun rises in Seaside Heights, N.J. behind the Jet Star Roller Coaster which has been sitting in the ocean after part of the Funtown Pier was destroyed during Superstorm Sandy. (Mel Evans/AP)

Climate change — with its superstorms and rising sea levels — are a concern for much of the planet, and pose a particular challenge for coastal towns and cities — like Boston. Consider the impact of Hurricane Sandy last year on coastal New York and New Jersey, and it's no wonder that climate scientists project that Boston's Back Bay could one day become "the Venice section of Boston."

With that in mind, Gov. Patrick announced a new set of initiatives Tuesday to prepare the state for the impact of climate change on public health, transportation and basic infrastructure. The plan includes a $40 million grant program to help cities and towns protect energy services and clean water supplies — and to help coastal communities prepare for higher sea levels.

Patrick spoke earlier today at the New England Aquarium.

"What is the cost of inaction?" asked Patrick. "We are trying to be thoughtful and not careless but to think big and to act, if you will, commensurate with the challenge."

For a look a closer look at the governor's plan, and for some analysis of the challenge ahead, WBUR's Anthony Brooks spoke with Seth Kaplan, vice president for policy and climate advocacy at the Conservation Law Foundation.

Guest

Seth Kaplan, vice president for policy and climate advocacy at the Conservation Law Foundation. He tweets at @sethlkap.

More

WBUR: Gov. Patrick To Announce $40M In Climate Change Prep Grants

WBUR: Boston Plans For 'Near-Term Risk' Of Rising Tides

Boston Globe: Rising Water Levels Threaten Boston’s Waterfront

This segment aired on January 14, 2014.

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