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Watching Scotland Decide On Independence From Jamaica Plain08:18
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A view of cupcakes decorated with the Union and Scottish Saltire flags, and question marks, along with the results of sales, at Cuckoo's bakery, in Edinburgh, Scotland, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014. The bakery has been monitoring the sales of its Union and Saltire flag and undecided cupcakes for 200 days to try and predict the outcome of the referendum. 43.5 percent of sales were Yes cakes, 47.7 percent No, and 8.8 percent undecided. (AP)MoreCloseclosemore
A view of cupcakes decorated with the Union and Scottish Saltire flags, and question marks, along with the results of sales, at Cuckoo's bakery, in Edinburgh, Scotland, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014. The bakery has been monitoring the sales of its Union and Saltire flag and undecided cupcakes for 200 days to try and predict the outcome of the referendum. 43.5 percent of sales were Yes cakes, 47.7 percent No, and 8.8 percent undecided. (AP)

Friday, citizens of the United Kingdom will wake up to a kingdom that could be a little less united.

Thursday, the Scots were voting — an estimated 97 percent of them — on whether to remain a part of Great Britain, or to break away and become Europe's newest independent country.

The referendum has sparked a debate that we're very familiar with here in Boston, though under far different circumstances.

Scots in Boston don't have a vote in the official ballot, so they'll have to be content to watch from afar. That's what's happening in the Haven Pub in Jamaica Plain in Boston.

Guest

Jason Waddleton, owner of The Haven pub.

More

Here & Now: As Scots Vote, Economists Around The World Are Watching

  • "Supporters of independence welcome the opportunity, but questions remain about what will happen to the global economy if the vote is successful."

This segment aired on September 18, 2014.

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