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New ADHD Treatment Calls for Parenting, Not Pills07:51
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Most of Boston Medical Center's patients come from the inner city, according to Dr. Michael Silverstein. (Wikimedia Commons)MoreCloseclosemore
Most of Boston Medical Center's patients come from the inner city, according to Dr. Michael Silverstein. (Wikimedia Commons)

Finally today, a new study from Boston University School of Medicine tested a novel approach to treating ADHD in low-income children, and it has nothing to do with giving medication to kids. Instead, it's all about talking with parents.

Using a technique called "motivational interviewing," the researchers were able to guide the parents into positive modelling for their children with ADHD.

Guests

Carey Goldberg, co-host of WBUR’s CommonHealth blog. She tweets at @commonhealth.

Michael Silverstein, director of the division of general pediatrics at Boston Medical Center, associate professor of pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine.

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CommonHealth: Study: A Simple, Cheap Way To Help Low-Income Kids With ADHD

  • "In a study of 156 young patients just out in the journal Pediatrics, Silverstein and colleagues report some success with an experimental intervention they designed to address such challenging cases.They found that with a relatively modest investment — about a week of training for a care manager that the patients’ families interact with anyway — they could “move the needle” on ADHD symptoms and social skills, he says."
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