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Why The Battle Between Apple And The FBI Matters In Massachusetts16:29

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Protesters in more than 30 cities have lashed out at the FBI for obtaining a court order that requires Apple to make it easier to unlock an encrypted iPhone. (Eric Risberg/AP)closemore
Protesters in more than 30 cities have lashed out at the FBI for obtaining a court order that requires Apple to make it easier to unlock an encrypted iPhone. (Eric Risberg/AP)

The Boston Globe reported this week that Apple is refusing to help the FBI unlock the iPhone of an alleged Boston gang member, similar to what's happening in the San Bernardino terrorism case.

The fight is over privacy and security and two Massachusetts technologists say it could affect the state's technology-driven economy.

Guests

Paul Sagan, executive-in-residence at General Catalyst Partners and former CEO of Akamai Technologies. He tweets @PaulSagan1.

Michael Sullivan, partner at The Ashcroft Law Firm and former U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts.

More

The Boston Globe: What Apple’s Fight With The FBI Means For Massachusetts

  • "The case also raises deep questions that cut to the core of American competitiveness. Making secure software is hard enough without explicitly installing back doors that would create a giant, blazing target for hackers, and cracking them would give bad guys unprecedented access to data and other personal information. The rest of the world would know these back doors existed, so why would anyone feel safe using a product with American software?"

NPR: Encryption, Privacy Are Larger Issues Than Fighting Terrorism, Clarke Says

  • "And within the United States government, we've decided long ago that there are limits on what we're going to do in the war against terrorism. Under the Obama administration, for example, we've said we're not going to torture people. You know, we could, at the far extreme to make the FBI's job easier, put ankle bracelets on everybody so that we'd know where everybody was all the time. That's a ridiculous example, but my point is encryption and privacy are larger issues than fighting terrorism."

The New York Times: Apple Encryption Engineers, If Ordered To Unlock iPhone, Might Resist

  • "Apple employees are already discussing what they will do if ordered to help law enforcement authorities. Some say they may balk at the work, while others may even quit their high-paying jobs rather than undermine the security of the software they have already created, according to more than a half-dozen current and former Apple employees."

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