A WBUR SPECIAL SERIES

‘Moral Injury': An Invisible Wound Of War

(AP)

Veterans who have been a part of something that betrays their sense of right and wrong often find themselves grappling with what researchers are only now beginning to understand – something that PTSD doesn’t quite capture. They call it “moral injury.” It’s not a diagnosis, but an explanation for many veterans’ emotional responses to their experiences of war.

Our series on moral injury is a collaboration between WBUR and American Public Media’s Public Insight Network. The series launches June 24.

How To Treat A Veteran’s ‘Moral Injury’

It’s a term some experts use to describe the aftereffects of some aspects of active duty.

For Soldiers At War, A Rewiring Of Their Sense Of Right And Wrong

Giselle Sterling, 31, served in Afghanistan. Her father, Nelson, served during the Vietnam War. The two are just now beginning to compare their experiences of war.

A Crisis Of Compassion In The Chaos Of War

During his second deployment to Iraq, ‘Tom’ found he had trouble holding on to his moral compass. And then reality hit — in the form of a local Iraqi’s dog.

‘Moral Injury': Gaining Traction, But Still Controversial

Experts say members of the military have trouble with the idea that the very thing they are trained to do can injure them.

Defining The Deep Pain PTSD Doesn't Capture

The concept of moral injury — a betrayal of your sense of right and wrong — has helped Marine Corps Capt. Tyler Boudreau understand years of pain that therapy and medications for PTSD didn’t address.

‘Moral Injury': When Soldiers Betray Their Sense Of Right And Wrong

Veterans who have been a part of something that betrays their sense of right and wrong often find themselves grappling with what researchers are only now beginning to understand. “Moral injury” is not a diagnosis, but an explanation for many veterans’ emotional responses to their experiences of war.

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