WBUR Staff

Carey Goldberg

Reporter, Common Health, WBUR

Carey Goldberg is the co-host of WBUR’s CommonHealth blog. She has been the Boston bureau chief of The New York Times, a staff Moscow correspondent for The Los Angeles Times, and a health/science reporter for The Boston Globe. She was a Knight Science Journalism fellow at MIT; graduated summa cum laude from Yale; and did graduate work at Harvard. She is co-author of the triple memoir “Three Wishes: A True Story Of Good Friends, Crushing Heartbreak and Astonishing Luck On Our Way To Love and Motherhood.”

Recent stories

Latest Checkup Podcast: Teen Zombies, From Sleep To Porn To Impulsive Choices

May 27, 2015
(Photo: Hypnotica Studios Infinite, Flickr Creative Commons)

The latest episode of The Checkup podcast explores three aspects of the mysterious teen brain: Sleep, porn and impulsive decisions.

Public Pay: UMass Med School Chief Now Earning Nearly $900K

May 26, 2015
Screen shot 2015-05-26 at 10.45.02 AM

Once again, the chancellor of the University of Massachusetts Medical School is the highest-paid public employee in the state, with a salary of nearly $900,000, prompting the question: at what point does a taxpayer-paid or nonprofit salary become unseemly?

Why We Need To Talk Now About The Brave New World Of Editing Genes

May 22, 2015
Screen shot 2015-05-21 at 7.48.44 PM

A new tool for editing genes, known by the acronym CRISPR, is so powerful that it’s sparking debate about whether humankind should tinker with its own gene pool.

Q&A: A Taste Of The Looming Ethical Debate On Gene-Editing Humans

May 22, 2015
Boston University bio-ethicist George Annas discusses the ethical issues raised by new gene-editing tools that may eventually allow humankind to control its own genetic legacy. (Courtesy)

Some scientists are saying we need a broad societal discussion of whether we should use powerful new gene-editing tools to tinker with humanity’s heredity. A leading bio-ethicist offers a taste of what that conversation may sound like.

Why To Exercise Today: Researcher Says It May Slow Tumors

May 20, 2015
MilitaryHealth/flickr

Research in rats suggest that the increased blood flow that comes from exercise could actually slow tumors down.

‘Only A Game’ Questions NFL Medical Advisor On Football Safety

May 15, 2015
(Kevin Domingue/Flickr Creative Commons)

An excellent “Only a Game” commentary questions Brigham and Womens’ Hospital President Dr. Elizabeth Nabel, the new medical advisor to the NFL, who recently said football is safer than ever and she would let her own kids play.

50 Years Of American Health Choices: Smoking Gains Offset By Getting Fatter

May 13, 2015
(Lucia Sofo via Wikimedia Commons)

You can see the last half-century of American’s health behaviors as half-empty or half-full: Our health gains from shunning cigarettes and safer driving are almost entirely offset by the rise in obesity and overdoses.

The Checkup: How Patients Can Try To Take The Power Back

May 11, 2015
(Photo: MTSO Fan/Flickr Creative Commons)

The latest episode of “The Checkup” podcasts looks at three ways patients can take more control in the health care system: Shopping for care, telling their stories, and accessing their data.

No Panacea: Latest Good News, Bad News On Health Reform

May 06, 2015
President Obama signing the health care bill into law in 2011.

New studies add to the findings that health care reform providing insurance coverage is only a start; more must be done to improve people’s actual health outcomes.

Can Mindfulness Help My Raging Anxiety When My Kid Gets Sick?

May 01, 2015
(Mary MacTavish/Compfight)

If you — like many parents — freak out when your child gets even a garden-variety sickness, a psychology professor explains how mindfulness may help.

Lilac, Hemlock, Maple: How Climate Change Is Transforming New England Plant Life

March 26, 2015
The Middlesex Fells Reservation is seen on March 10. (Albert Lew/Flickr)

The most thorough report yet on the state of New England plant life includes climate change as one of the threats the plants face; already, global warming has led to earlier bloom times for flowering plants like lilacs, and if current trends continue, in 50 years Massachusetts could have the climate of current-day Georgia.

Translation: Chechnya Leader Says Don’t Blame Us, Look To America

April 19, 2013

Chechnya leader Ramzan Kadyrov seems to be saying, “Don’t blame Chechnya.” He also points the finger at America. The text is translated from Russian.

Russian Media On Bombing Suspects: Childhood In Kyrgyzstan, Hints Of Extremism

April 19, 2013

From the major Russian newspaper Izvestia: Izvestia has learned that the suspect in the Boston terrorist acts, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, did come to America from Makhachala.

Translation: Boston Marathon Bombing Suspect’s Possible Social Media Page

April 19, 2013

To all appearances, this image is a social media page created on V Kontakte, the Russian equivalent of Facebook, early last year, and purports to belong to Djohar Tsarnaev, the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings.

My Son, The Dragon Slayer: The Risks And Rewards Of Growing Up Gaming

January 24, 2013
Carey’s 8-year-old son Tully plays the game “Skyrim” on their family computer. (George Hicks/WBUR)

What does it mean to grow up gaming? Critics warn that games may be addictive and lead to aggression. Supporters say that games may be the best educational tools ever.

How Much Lyme Disease Are We Living With?

June 28, 2012
The Blacklegged tick, commonly referred to as the deer tick, is prevalent in Massachusetts. (AP)

It’s hard to tell exactly how much Lyme disease there is in Massachusetts, but an estimated 1 in 100 people get it each year in most areas.

In Lincoln, It’s Town Vs. Ticks

June 25, 2012
Lincoln resident Robin Wilkerson pulls ticks off her dog Stella several times each day. (George Hicks/WBUR)

Lincoln is one of the richest towns in the U.S. But Lincoln’s wealth has provided no immunity to a disease that is spreading dramatically across Massachusetts: Lyme disease.

Resource List: Lyme Disease

June 25, 2012
Relative sizes of several ticks at different life stages. In general, adult ticks are approximately the size of a sesame seed and nymphal ticks are approximately the size of a poppy seed. (CDC)

A list of resources for more comprehensive information about Lyme disease.

Mass. Senate Unveils Health Care Financing Bill

May 09, 2012

The Massachusetts Senate rolled out its proposal for health care cost control Wednesday. It follows a similar plan the House released Friday.

Riley Cerabona: A Young Girl Living With CLOVES Syndrome

April 06, 2012
Riley Cerabona (Courtesy of Kristen Davis)

Riley Cerabona was born with a rare disease that currently can only be treated with surgery

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