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Photos: Illuminus Art And Technology Festival Shines In Boston's South End

The floor seemed to ripple in response to people's movements in Wenting Guo's "Fabric Play" at the Illuminus festival in October 2012. (Greg Cook)MoreCloseclosemore
The floor seemed to ripple in response to people's movements in Wenting Guo's "Fabric Play" at the Illuminus festival in October 2012. (Greg Cook)

Thousands of people flocked to Boston's South End last night for the first lluminus, “a free nighttime festival of creative innovation,” including large-scale projections, light installations, immersive environments, sound and performances by some 40 artists. The art lit up the old, Harrison Avenue power station and other buildings in the neighborhood.

Previously: Illuminus Arts Festival To Light Up Boston’s South End Tomorrow Night.

Greg Cook is co-founder of WBUR’s ARTery. Be his friend on Twitter @AestheticResear and on the Facebook.

Polka dots are projected across the facade of the old power plant. (Greg Cook)
Polka dots are projected across the facade of the old power plant. (Greg Cook)
Spotlights illuminated fabric streamers hanging inside the old power plant. (Greg Cook)
Spotlights illuminated fabric streamers hanging inside the old power plant. (Greg Cook)
The floor seemed to ripple in response to people's movements in Wenting Guo's "Fabric Play." (Greg Cook)
The floor seemed to ripple in response to people's movements in Wenting Guo's "Fabric Play." (Greg Cook)
Music and projections filled the interior of the old power plant. (Greg Cook)
Music and projections filled the interior of the old power plant. (Greg Cook)
Inside the old power plant. (Greg Cook)
Inside the old power plant. (Greg Cook)
Art by Caleb Neelon is projected across the exterior of the old power plant. (Greg Cook)
Art by Caleb Neelon is projected across the exterior of the old power plant. (Greg Cook)
In New American Public Art's project, visitors (right) could have their faces projected onto a 25-foot-tall plastic face (left) hanging on the outside of the old power plant. (Greg Cook)
In New American Public Art's project, visitors (right) could have their faces projected onto a 25-foot-tall plastic face (left) hanging on the outside of the old power plant. (Greg Cook)
A projection on a building along Boston's Harrison Avenue. (Greg Cook)
A projection on a building along Boston's Harrison Avenue. (Greg Cook)
People stood inside the cube of streamers in the old power plant. (Greg Cook)
People stood inside the cube of streamers in the old power plant. (Greg Cook)
Projections flowed across the exterior of the old power plant off Boston's Harrison Avenue. (Greg Cook)
Projections flowed across the exterior of the old power plant off Boston's Harrison Avenue. (Greg Cook)

Greg Cook Twitter Arts Reporter
Greg Cook was an arts reporter and critic for WBUR's The ARTery.

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