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This Is What Boston Landmarks Would Look Like If They Were Gingerbread Houses

City Hall Plaza offers boating in the confection by LDa Architecture & Interiors of Cambridge. (Courtesy)
City Hall Plaza offers boating in the confection by LDa Architecture & Interiors of Cambridge. (Courtesy)

In answer to the age-old question “What would Boston landmarks look like if they were gingerbread houses,” 15 local architecture firms have created cookie versions of Boston City Hall, Trinity Church, the Prudential Tower and other iconic Boston buildings.

See them yourself at the fourth annual exhibit of gingerbread houses at the Boston Society of Architects’ gallery, BSA Space in Boston, through Jan. 3. The show is open to the public and free.

The sweet structures are up for online auction through Dec. 21 to raise money for Community Design Resource Center of Boston, which provides “pro bono technical assistance to community groups, nonprofits, and municipalities in projects that involve and benefit underserved communities throughout metropolitan Boston,” the nonprofit says.


Follow Greg Cook, ARTery's gingerbread house reporter, on Twitter @AestheticResear or on the Facebook.

Boston City Hall is visited by a giant elf in this holiday vision by Arrowstreet of Boston. (Courtesy)
Boston City Hall is visited by a giant elf in this holiday vision by Arrowstreet of Boston. (Courtesy)
The Prudential Tower, the Citgo sign and 200 Clarendon (the building formerly known as the Hancock) are modeled by The Jones Payne Group of Boston. (Courtesy)
The Prudential Tower, the Citgo sign and 200 Clarendon (the building formerly known as the Hancock) are modeled by The Jones Payne Group of Boston. (Courtesy)
Trinity Church—architect Henry Hobson Richardson’s landmark 1877 Romanesque revival building in Copley Square—retains its grandeur in this monumental chocolate and cookie construction by Goody Clancy of Boston. (Courtesy)
Trinity Church—architect Henry Hobson Richardson’s landmark 1877 Romanesque revival building in Copley Square—retains its grandeur in this monumental chocolate and cookie construction by Goody Clancy of Boston. (Courtesy)
The Institute of Contemporary Art as modeled by Allevato Architects of Franklin. (Courtesy)
The Institute of Contemporary Art as modeled by Allevato Architects of Franklin. (Courtesy)
Water runs through Rowes Wharf arch in this Boston cityscape by Margulies Perruzzi Architects of Boston. “Sea level rise is a recurring theme to many of our houses,” BSA Space reports. (Courtesy)
Water runs through Rowes Wharf arch in this Boston cityscape by Margulies Perruzzi Architects of Boston. “Sea level rise is a recurring theme to many of our houses,” BSA Space reports. (Courtesy)
City Hall Plaza offers boating and sledding in this fanciful cookie rendering by LDa Architecture & Interiors of Cambridge. (Courtesy)
City Hall Plaza offers boating and sledding in this fanciful cookie rendering by LDa Architecture & Interiors of Cambridge. (Courtesy)
The 19th century Holy Trinity German Church on Shawmut Avenue in Boston is converted into some three dozen luxury condos in Finegold Alexander Architects’ cookie model of their actual planned reuse of the South End building, now dubbed “The Lucas.” (Courtesy)
The 19th century Holy Trinity German Church on Shawmut Avenue in Boston is converted into some three dozen luxury condos in Finegold Alexander Architects’ cookie model of their actual planned reuse of the South End building, now dubbed “The Lucas.” (Courtesy)
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